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General Karl Freiherr von Pflanzer-Baltin in the snowy field, officers, soldiers with horses at the ready, and a column of soldiers behind him.
Text:
Östl. Kriegsschauplatz. Generaloberst Freiherr von Pflanzer-Baltin. Serie 29/2. Nach Photographien des Pressedienstess des k.u.k. Kriegsministeriums
Austrian Front. Colonel General Baron von Pflanzer-Baltin. After photographs of the press office of the Imperial and Royal Ministry of War.
Reverse:
Ausgabe des Kriegsfürsorgeamtes Wien IX.
Zum Gloria-Viktoria Album
Sammel. u. Nachschlagewerk des Völkerkrieges
War Office Assistance Edition, Vienna IX
For Gloria Victoria album
Collection and reference book of international war
Reverse:
Ausgabe des Kriegsfürsorgeamtes Wien IX.
Zum Gloria-Viktoria Album
Sammel. u. Nachschlagewerk des Völkerkrieges
War Office Assistance Edition, Vienna IX
For Gloria Victoria album
Collection and reference book of international war.

General Karl Freiherr von Pflanzer-Baltin in the snowy field.

A hold-to-light postcard of the German and Austro-Hungarian victory (shortlived) over the Russians in the Uzroker Pass in the Carpathians on January 28, 1915. Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf, Chief of the Austro-Hungarian General Staff, launched an offensive with three armies on January 23 including the new Austro-Hungarian Seventh Army under General Karl von Pflanzer-Baltin.
Text:
Karpathen
Siegreiche Kämpfe am Uzroker-Paß
28. Januar 1915 
The Carpathians
Victorious fighting at the Uzroker Pass
January 28, 1915
Reverse:
Message dated and field postmarked September 7, 1916, 29th Infantry Division.

A hold-to-light postcard of the German and Austro-Hungarian victory (shortlived) over the Russians in the Uzroker Pass in the Carpathians on January 28, 1915. Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf, Chief of the Austro-Hungarian General Staff, launched an offensive with three armies on January 23, including the new Austro-Hungarian Seventh Army under General Karl von Pflanzer-Baltin.

An English battle cruiser under fire in the Battle of Dogger Bank, January 24, 1915. From a painting by Willy Stöwer.
Text:
Willy Stöwer 1915
Reverse:
Kolonialkriegerdank
Eingetrag. Verein zur Unterstüzung ehemaliger Kolonialkrieger der Armee, Marine, der Schutz-, und Polizeitruppen sowie deren Hinterbliebenen
Berlin W 35, Potsdamer Str. 98a
Schutzherr: Herzog Johann Albrecht zu Mecklenburg Ehrenpräsid.; Herzog Adolf Friedrich zu Mecklenburg Frhr. v. Gaul, General d. Inf., Mital. d. Herrenhauseß
Aus dem Seegefecht in der Nordsee am 24. Jan. 1915. Englischer Schlachtkreuzer im Salvenfeuer deutscher Kreuzer. Nach einem Original von Prof. Willy Stöwer.
No. 10.
Colonial Warrior Thanks
Registered association for technology to support the former colonial warriors of the Army, Navy, protection troops, and police forces and their dependents
Berlin W 35, Potsdamer Str. 98a
Patron: the Duke Johann Albrecht of Mecklenburg Honorary President; Duke Adolf Friedrich of Mecklenburg Baron. von. Gaul, Infantry General, Fellow-elder of the Prussian House of Lords
From the naval battle in the North Sea on January 24, 1915. An English battle cruiser under a salvo from a German cruiser. From an original by Prof. Willy Stöwer.
No. 10

An English battle cruiser under fire in the Battle of Dogger Bank, January 24, 1915. From a painting by Willy Stöwer.

Map of the Artois region north of the city of Arras, France, from The Illustrated War News, Part 41, May 19, 1915. The French launched the Second Battle of Artois on May 9, 1915 to try to capture the heights of Notre Dame de Lorette and Vimy.
Text:
Where the French are making important progress: the Carency district, the scene of the victorious battle and the line of the Loos-Arras advance.

Map of the Artois region north of the city of Arras, France, from The Illustrated War News, Part 41, May 19, 1915. The French launched the Second Battle of Artois on May 9, 1915 to try to capture the heights of Notre Dame de Lorette and Vimy.

Great Britain declared the entire North Sea a military zone as of November 5, 1914, imposing a blockade of Germany with nets, mines, and ships from Scotland across the northern end of the North Sea, and at the mouth of the English Channel. Germany's response depended on its submarine fleet.
Text:
Die Blockade Englands
Unsere Unterseeboote bei der Arbeit
The Blockade of England
Our submarines at work
Reverse:
Serie 2652/6
Logo: R&K (?)

Great Britain declared the entire North Sea a military zone as of November 5, 1914, imposing a blockade of Germany with nets, mines, and ships from Scotland across the northern end of the North Sea, and at the mouth of the English Channel. Germany's response depended on its submarine fleet.

Quotations found: 7

Friday, January 22, 1915

"Gen. Pflanzer's Austrian Army moving eastward, retook the Kirlibaba Pass on January 22nd [1915], sweeping on through Bukowina to Czernowitz, the capital, which he occupied on February 18th. Only a single Russian column, 30,000 men at most, opposed the advance of his great army." ((1), more)

Saturday, January 23, 1915

"To throw the Russian army out of the Carpathians and reestablish a solid foothold in Galicia, Conrad counterattacked, sending three armies forward on January 23[, 1915]. One Austro-Hungarian army, Boroevic's Third, would take the passes of the western Carpathians; Linsingen's Südarmee would seize the central passes, and further east General Karl von Pflanzer-Baltin's Army Group (which would shortly be renamed the Seventh Army) would attack through the Bukovina to strike the Russian flank. As Falkenhayn had predicted, nothing substantial could be expected in this ice-bound wilderness, even the usually exculpatory Austrian general staff history judging the counteroffensive toward Przemysl — directed by Conrad from his comfortable headquarters in Teschen — 'a cruel folly.'" ((2), more)

Sunday, January 24, 1915

". . . a tremendous picture, although we could hear almost nothing of the thunder of the guns, because of the noise of our engines. The Blücher was left behind as our forces steamed off and she was unable to follow. The four English battlecruisers fired at her together. She replied for as long as she could, until she was completely shrouded in smoke and apparently on fire. At 1207 she heeled over and capsized. We then observed the enemy's withdrawal, and followed our forces as rearguard. You can imagine how distressing it was for me to watch the Blücher capsize, and be helpless to do anything but observe and report. We didn't drop bombs on the English ships. We had no chance because the clouds were at 1,300 feet. If we had dared to fly over them at this altitude, we would have been shot down." ((3), more)

Monday, January 25, 1915

"Early on the 25th January [1915] a deserter brought notice of an enemy attack on a larger scale against Cuinchy, now held by the 1st Brigade, and the French on its right; and against Givenchy, held by the 3rd Brigade. An attack did take place an hour and a half later, units of the German 84th Brigade (XIV. Corps) advancing south, and units of the 79th Brigade (VII. Corps)) north of the canal." ((4), more)

Tuesday, January 26, 1915

"On January 26, 1915, it was announced that the German Federal Council had decided to take under its control all the stocks of corn and flour in the country, on and from February 1st. It was at once anticipated that this measure would cause the British Government to regard all cargoes of foodstuffs destined for Germany as consigned to the German Government, and therefore contraband of war." ((5), more)


Quotation contexts and source information

Friday, January 22, 1915

(1) Although the Russian drive on Cracow and into Silesia had been driven back by the Germans and Austro-Hungarians, the Russians had besieged the great Austro-Hungarian fortress city of Przemyśl on the San River, and still threatened to break through the passes of the Carpathian Mountains, putting them in a position to attack Budapest, the Hungarian capital. The Austro-Hungarians were particularly concerned about the loss of Bukovina out of concern that Russia would offer it to neutral Romania in exchange for their entry into the war on the side of the Entente Allies. General Pflanzer-Baltin was brought out of retirement after the defeat and dismissal of a number of Austro-Hungarian generals in 1914.

King's Complete History of the World War by W.C. King, pp. 144, 145, copyright © 1922, by W.C. King, publisher: The History Associates, publication date: 1922

Saturday, January 23, 1915

(2) Conrad, Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf, was Chief of the Austro-Hungarian General Staff until his dismissal in 1917. He had lost Galicia and Bukovina, Austria-Hungary's northeastern provinces, on the Russian side of the Carpathian Mountains, in 1914, and hoped to regain them in his offensive. He also hoped to end the threat of the Russians advancing through the Carpathian passes into Hungary. Erich von Falkenhayn, commander of the German Army, did not believe that war would be won on the eastern front, but rather in the west against France and England. Przemyśl was Austria-Hungary's greatest fortress city in Galicia.

A Mad Catastrophe by Geoffrey Wawro, pp. 349, 350, copyright © 2014 by Geoffrey Wawro, publisher: Basic Books

Sunday, January 24, 1915

(3) Extract from an account of the January 24, 1915 Battle of Dogger Bank by Lieutenant-Commander Heinrich Mathy who was overhead in Zeppelin L5 when the German battleship Blücher sank. The previous day, the British had decoded a German wireless message that a battle squadron of the German Fleet would cruise into the North Sea. Royal Navy squadrons under Admiral David Beatty and Commodore Tyrwhitt sailed to join and intercept them. The German fleet included four battle-cruisers, six light cruisers, and twenty-two destroyers. The English had five battle-cruisers, four light cruisers, and thirty-five destroyers. Shortly after dawn on January 24, the three forces converged. Outnumbered, the German fleet turned to flee to port. On both sides, the ships were the among the fastest in their fleets, but the English ships were faster, and slowly closed a gap that had been as much as 14 miles.

About 9:00 AM, the British began firing on the Blücher and the other German battleships. The British had the advantage, but over the course of nearly two hours the wireless and signalling lights of Admiral Beatty's ship were destroyed, and he could communicate only by signal flags. When the British thought they had seen a submarine periscope, Beatty feared they were sailing into a trap, and turned his ships to avoid the danger, intending to continue the fight. In the smoke and confusion, officers on Beatty's other ships understood the signal flags to be orders to turn away from the main fleet and focus on Blücher. By the time Beatty clarified his commands, the German fleet had escaped.

Naval Battles of the First World War by Geoffrey Bennett, pp. 144, 145, copyright © Geoffrey Bennett 1968, 1974, publisher: Pan Books, publication date: 1983

Monday, January 25, 1915

(4) Excerpt from a history of British Military Operations in France and Belgium, 1915. The previous paragraph notes that, 'the front was never at rest ; but the principal combats took place in two areas,' one of them being in front of Cuinchy on the La Bassée Canal. Cuinchy is immediately south of the Canal, Givenchy immediately north.

Military Operations France and Belgium, 1915, Vol. I, Winter 1914-15: Battle of Neuve Chappelle : Battle of Ypres [Second] by J. E. Edmonds, pp. 29, 30, copyright © asserted, publisher: Macmillan and Co., Limited, publication date: 1927

Tuesday, January 26, 1915

(5) Great Britain declared the entire North Sea a military zone as of November 5, 1914. It was well-positioned to impose a blockade of Germany with nets, mines, and ships from Scotland across the northern end of the North Sea, and at the mouth of the English Channel. Other Allied points of control included Gibraltar, Suez, and locations off Barcelona, Spain and Genoa, Italy.

Britain's blockade became increasingly restrictive as neutral ships were stopped and boarded, originally for military supplies, but increasingly for anything that could have a military use.

The Great Events of the Great War in Seven Volumes by Charles F. Horne, Vol. III, 1915, p. 55, copyright © 1920 by The National Alumnia, publisher: The National Alumni, publication date: 1920


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