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Front cover of %i1%La Domenica del Corriere%i0% of August 22–29, 1915, an illustrated weekly supplement to Corriere della Sera, published in Milan, Italy. The front and back covers are full-page illustrations by the great Italian illustrator Achille Beltrame. The front cover is an illustration of contemporary trench warfare, with soldiers throwing both ball and stick grenades to turn back an enemy attack. The back cover is an illustration of Italian author, pilot, soldier, and self-promoter Gabriele d'Annunzio dropping streamers in the colors of the Italian flag and bearing patriotic massages over the city of Trieste, Austria-Hungary.
Text:
Guerra modernissima: i nostri lanciano granate a mano nelle trincee nemiche distanti pochi metri.
Ultimate modern war: our hand grenades are thrown into enemy trenches a few meters away.
(Disegno de A. Beltrame).
Reverse:
Il volo di d'Annunzio su Trieste. Il Poeta lancia patriottici messaggi ai nostri fratelli: 'La fine del vostro martirio è prossima!'
The flight of d'Annunzio over Trieste. The Poet launches patriotic messages to our brothers: 'The end of your martyrdom is near!'
(Disegno de A. Beltrame).
220602472241
1915 D'annunzio il volo su Trieste con lancio messaggi

Front cover of La Domenica del Corriere of August 22–29, 1915, an illustrated weekly supplement to Corriere della Sera, published in Milan, Italy. The front and back covers are full-page illustrations by the great Italian illustrator Achille Beltrame. The front cover is an illustration of contemporary trench warfare, with soldiers throwing both ball and stick grenades to turn back an enemy attack. The back cover is an illustration of Italian author, pilot, soldier, and self-promoter Gabriele d'Annunzio dropping streamers in the colors of the Italian flag and bearing patriotic massages over the city of Trieste, Austria-Hungary.

An Austro-Hungarian Young Troop New Blood Generation Machine, turning babies into soldiers. A postcard by Rud. Kristen for the benefit of Deutschmeister- Witwen- und Waisen-Stiftung (Aktion im Felde) — the German Master Widows and Orphans Foundation (Action in the Field).
Text:
K.u.K Truppen-Nachwuchs-Erzeugungs-Maschine
K.u.K Troops Offspring Generation Machine
K.u.K.: Kaiserlich und Königlich: Imperial and Royal
Signed Rud. Kristen.
Reverse:
Deutschmeister- Witwen- und Waisen-Stiftung (Aktion im Felde)
Deutschmeister- Widows and Orphans Foundation (Action in the Field)
Druck: C. Pietsche, Wein V.
Printer: C. Pietsche, Vienna V.
Nr. 37.

An Austro-Hungarian Young Troop New Blood Generation Machine, turning babies into soldiers. A postcard by Rud. Kristen for the benefit of Deutschmeister- Witwen- und Waisen-Stiftung (Aktion im Felde) — the German Master Widows and Orphans Foundation (Action in the Field).

'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' — the Tower of London poppies — each of the 888,246 ceramic poppies representing one serviceman of the British Empire killed in World War I. The installation was a collaboration of artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper. Since November, 2014 the poppies have been installed in other sites in the United Kingdom. Photographed October 3, 2014.

'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' — the Tower of London poppies — each of the 888,246 ceramic poppies representing one serviceman of the British Empire killed in World War I. The installation was a collaboration of artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper. Since November, 2014 the poppies have been installed in other sites in the United Kingdom. Photographed October 3, 2014. © 2014 by John M. Shea

Wooden cigarette box carved by Г. САВИНСКИ (?; G. Savinskiy), a Russian POW. The Grim Reaper strides across a field of skulls on the cover. The base includes an intricate carving of the years of war years, '1914' and, turning it 90 degrees, '1918.'
Text:
ПДМЯТЬ ВОИНЬ 1914-18
To memory of soldiers 1914-18
Reverse:
1914
1918
Г. САВИНСКИ (?)
G. Savinskaya

Wooden cigarette box carved by Г. САВИНСКИ (?; G. Savinskiy), a Russian POW. The Grim Reaper strides across a field of skulls on the cover. The base includes an intricate carving of the years of war years, '1914' and, turning it 90 degrees, '1918.'

The conditions British Troops faced in Flanders and Passchendaele.
Text:
British Troops in Flanders
The British Troops in Flanders have had to contend with almost incredible difficulties, owing to the autumn and winter rains, which have converted the ground into a morass of bogs and swamps. The photograph shows a domestic scene behind the lines. Some of the men are washing in the floods, while others are shaving and dressing before the day's work begins.
S1
Reverse:
CS 684. Wt. 7685 - 74m. - 12/17/C. & S. E2202

The conditions British Troops faced in Flanders and Passchendaele.

Quotations found: 7

Saturday, September 22, 1917

"For ten days, we practised throwing hand-grenades, and rehearsed the undertaking on a piece of trench that was made in the image of the original. It was astonishing that with so much realism, I only had three men hurt by splinters. We were excused all other duties, so that on 22 September [1917] when I returned to the company position for the night, I was in charge of a semi-wild but useful band of men" ((1), more)

Sunday, September 23, 1917

"— If one were allowed to express one's views, I should write an article entitled 'The Vintage,' portraying the younger generation flung into the winepress, crushed, with the incessant gurgle of streaming blood—pale, frightened mothers looking on—while the levers of this winepress would be forced down by the unwearied arms of the ambitious politicians, the Chauvinists, the profiteers, while the idiot mob cheered them on. . . ." ((2), more)

Monday, September 24, 1917

"For over a week at the end of September 1917, a handful of German airmen held sway over millions of Londoners. In retrospect, their almost nightly visits were but an intimidation compounded of moonglow, concealing clouds, and the sinister throbbing of aeroplanes multiplied thrice over by the inflamed imagination of a much alarmed population. No other attacks 'remained more vividly in the memory of those who lived through the air raids on England' during the First World War." ((3), more)

Tuesday, September 25, 1917

"There are many instances of men who, on the eve of going into action, had an unshakable idea, a premonition, that they would not come out alive. Morgan Jones tells of one of his fellow-signallers, an intelligent well-read man. 'He asked me to go for a walk with him in the evening after tea. When we had gone a little way he turned to me and said, 'Look here, '95, I know something is going to happen to me to-morrow. I am not going to get through this business alive. I want you to take charge of my letters to-morrow; I'm expecting some money.' . . . My arguments failed to persuade him not to give room to such gloomy thoughts. When H.Q. Company led the way into the line next day one of the first to be killed was '91 Davies.'" ((4), more)

Wednesday, September 26, 1917

"At 11.45 D Company was forming up under some machine-gun fire. Two platoons of B arrived in time to advance with D at zero, noon. The only covering fire given was a few ineffectual smoke shells, because it was still thought that there were parties of the 98th Brigade in front, and there was no definite German position. Mann had just seen the other two platoons of B away when he was shot through the throat, and died almost immediately. Coster was shot through the head as his Company was entering a scraggy orchard, enclosed by a scraggier hedge, north of Jerk Farm : it is about 550 yards eastwards of Black Watch Corner. At this early stage the two Companies were losing touch. The extent of hedge, orchard and pill-box, and the consequent obstruction to view and control of movement, was underestimated on the map which had been our only source of information." ((5), more)


Quotation contexts and source information

Saturday, September 22, 1917

(1) German Lieutenant Ernst Jünger had fought in the first days of the Third Battle of Ypres, begun on July 31, 1917, but on August 10 was redeployed to the front southeast of Verdun, on the hills above Regniéville, a Village Détruit, a village destroyed in the war and never rebuilt.

Storm of Steel by Ernst Jünger, pp. 184–185, copyright © 1920, 1961, Translation © Michael Hoffman, 2003, publisher: Penguin Books, publication date: 2003

Sunday, September 23, 1917

(2) Entry for September 23 or 24, 1917 from the diary of Michel Corday, French senior civil servant. Corday supported peace efforts to end the war, and railed those he lists above, and others who demanded a fight to victory at any cost.

The Paris Front: an Unpublished Diary: 1914-1918 by Michel Corday, page 276, copyright © 1934, by E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc., publisher: E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc., publication date: 1934

Monday, September 24, 1917

(3) From Monday, September 24 to October 1, 1917, ninety-two German Gotha bombers took part in the Autumn Moon Offensive against England. Fifty-five of the two-engine planes reached England with twenty or fewer making it to London. A handful of Staaken Giant bombers also took part in the raids, with one reaching the capital. On six of the eight nights the bombers struck. A total of 69 people were killed and 260 wounded, some by shell casings from the British defensive barrage. Before the raids had ended, over 300,000 people had taken shelter in the London Underground. The quotation within our quotation from Fredette's excellent The Sky on Fire, is from The War in the Air by Henry Jones.

The Sky on Fire by Raymond H. Fredette by Raymond H. Fredette, page 137, copyright © 1966, 1976, 1991 by Raymond H. Fredette, publisher: Smithsonian Institution Press, publication date: 1991

Tuesday, September 25, 1917

(4) Excerpt from the entry for September 25, 1917 from the writings — diaries, letters, and memoirs — of Captain J. C. Dunn, Medical Officer of the Second Battalion His Majesty's Twenty-Third Foot, the Royal Welch Fusiliers, and fellow soldiers who served with him. Dunn was writing the night before the Battle of Polygon Wood. On September 28, he would write that his battalion had lost one-third of its men in the action, with more than 60 dead. Overall, the British suffered 15,375 casualties in the Polygon Wood battle, an engagement within the Third Battle of Ypres, then two months old.

The War the Infantry Knew 1914-1919 by Captain J.C. Dunn, page 393, copyright © The Royal Welch Fusiliers 1987, publisher: Abacus (Little, Brown and Company, UK), publication date: 1994

Wednesday, September 26, 1917

(5) Excerpt from the entry for September 26, 1917 from the writings — diaries, letters, and memoirs — of Captain J. C. Dunn, Medical Officer of the Second Battalion His Majesty's Twenty-Third Foot, the Royal Welch Fusiliers, and fellow soldiers who served with him. Dunn's entry covers his Battalion's part in the Battle of Polygon Wood. On September 28, he would write that his battalion had lost one-third of its men in the action, and 'more than 60 were dead. Mann was the greatest loss. He was an outstanding figure during the two years to a day he served with the Battalion.' Overall, the British suffered 15,375 casualties in the Polygon Wood battle, an engagement within the Third Battle of Ypres, begun two months before.

The War the Infantry Knew 1914-1919 by Captain J.C. Dunn, pp. 395–396, copyright © The Royal Welch Fusiliers 1987, publisher: Abacus (Little, Brown and Company, UK), publication date: 1994


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