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The Russian Duma: priest deputies and officers. From %i1%White Nights and Other Russian Impressions%i0% by Arthur Ruhl. Ruhl reported from Russia in 1917 after the February Revolution.
Text:
Priest deputies to the Duma strolling beside the lake adjoining Taurida Palace.
A group of 'Pristavs,' who acted as ushers, vote collectors, etc. in the national Duma.

The Russian Duma: priest deputies and officers. From White Nights and Other Russian Impressions by Arthur Ruhl. Ruhl reported from Russia in 1917 after the February Revolution.

A French soldier wearing the uniform of 1914/1915 stands by the side of a water-filled shell crater.
Text Reverse:
R. Guilleminot, Bœspnug et Cie. - Paris

A French soldier wearing the uniform of 1914/1915 stands by the side of a water-filled shell crater.

Map of the North and Baltic Seas (labeled 'Nord-See' and 'Ostsee') from a folding postcard of five battlefronts: the Western and Eastern Fronts; North and Baltic Seas, Mediterranean and Black Seas; and the Serbian-Montenegro Front.
Text:
Karten sämtl. Kriegsschauplätze
Österreichisch-serbisch-montenegrinisher Kriegsschauplatz.
Deutsch - österreichisch - russischer Kriegsschauplatz.
Deutsch - belgisch - französ. Kriegsschauplatz.
Deutsch-englisch-russisch. Seekriegsschauplatz.
Österreichisch - französisch-englischer Seekriegsschauplatz.
Preis 20 Heller
Bei Änderungen der Kriegsschauplätze erscheint Nachtrag. Nachdruck verboten.
Verlag Schöler, Wien-Döbling
Maps all of theaters of war
Austrian-Serbian-Montenegrin theater of war.
German - Austrian - Russian theater of war.
German - Belgian - French theater of war.
English-German Russian - Sea theater of war.
Austro - French-English - Sea theater of war.
Price 20 Heller
For changes in the battle fronts, an addendum is shown. Reprinting prohibited.
Publisher Schöler, Vienna-Döbling

Map of the North and Baltic Seas (labeledNord-See and Ostsee) from a folding postcard of five battlefronts: the Western and Eastern Fronts; North and Baltic Seas, Mediterranean and Black Seas; and the Serbian-Montenegro Front.

The 12th company advancing through shell fire to supply the 1st Battalion, 32nd Landwehr Infantry Regiment. A watercolor painting by Otto Oettel of the German 32nd Landwehr dated September 29, 1916.
Text:
signed: Oettel Sep 29 1916 - L32
Reverse:
12th company goes ahead through shell fire to supply the 1st battalion L32 [Translation courtesy Thomas Faust, ebay's Urfaust]

The 12th company advancing through shell fire to supply the 1st Battalion, 32nd Landwehr Infantry Regiment. A watercolor painting by Otto Oettel of the German 32nd Landwehr dated September 29, 1916.

A squadron of the %+%Organization%m%57%n%German Imperial Navy%-% under the eye of a Zeppelin off the North Sea island and port of %+%Location%m%54%n%Helgoland%-%.
Text:
Deutscher Geschwader vor Helgoland
German squadron off Heligoland
Logo, bottom left: M Dieterle, Kiel
bottom right: PH 125
Handwritten: 1915
Reverse:
Verlag: M Dieterle, Kiel.

A squadron of the German Imperial Navy under the eye of a Zeppelin off the North Sea island and port of Helgoland.

Quotations found: 7

Friday, May 26, 1916

"This morning P——— brought me somewhat alarming reports of revolutionary propaganda in factories and barracks.

. . .

At the club this evening I casually overheard the remark: 'If the Duma is not suppressed we are lost!' followed by a long rigmarole proving the necessity of an immediate return of tsarism to the pure traditions of Muscovite orthodoxy.

. . . I think it will not be forty years, or even forty months, before the Russian State collapses."
((1), more)

Saturday, May 27, 1916

"What's really annoying is that when you have to go you really don't know where to go everywhere is dangerous and so you hold it as long as you can but at some point you just have to go. I am telling you this because this morning at one thirty I wanted to go and I got myself into a shell hole that was two meters deep. I just got there and right away there was a shell whistling by me I lay flat out and right away three more followed one of which exploded in a hole just 30 meters in front of me I grabbed my pants in both hands and ran for the dugout I laughed about it when I got to the shelter but if you could see the poor guys here running like that you would feel sorry for them." ((2), more)

Sunday, May 28, 1916

"It was against this background of raid and counter-raid with both sides baiting traps—Jellicoe to catch the High Sea Fleet away from its coast and Scheer to catch an isolated portion of the Grand Fleet—that the great naval battle of the war occurred almost by accident. At the end of May [1916], Jellicoe decided to send two light cruiser squadrons around the Skaw into the Kattegat on 2 June to sweep as far south as the Great Belt and the Sound. There would be a battle squadron in the Skaggerak in support, and Jellicoe and Beatty would be to the northwest with all their forces ready to intervene if the High Sea Fleet moved north out of the Bight. British submarines would also be off the Dogger Bank and south of the Horns Reef, and the minelayer Abdiel would extend the minefields laid on 3–4 May. The seaplane carrier Engadine, escorted by a light cruiser squadron and destroyers, would be off Horns Reef to watch for Zeppelins." ((3), more)

Monday, May 29, 1916

". . . today's colour effects were a sheer joy to watch. According as a shell burst in coal, chalk, or soil, there was a dust fountain of black, white, or terra-cotta, or a mixture of two of these; and there were woolly air-bursts that rolled out in whorls—grey-black, pure white, and lemon. Sometimes there was a hint of the human soil on which shells were falling when a largish, flaccid thing rose in the spout, and one was sorry for the men there, whichever side they were on." ((4), more)

Tuesday, May 30, 1916

"Hipper and his battle cruisers sailed from the Jade at 1 A.M. on the 31st [May, 1916], and Scheer and the main portion of the High Sea Fleet sailed from the Jade and the Elbe shortly afterward. The British were already at sea. Room 40 had been able to warn the Admiralty that the Germans were preparing to put to sea, and at 5:40 on the afternoon of 30 May, the Admiralty ordered Jellicoe, who along with Beatty had already been alerted, to concentrate in the Long Forties. By 10:30 the Grand Fleet had sailed from Scapa Flow and the Moray Firth, and Beatty sailed from the Firth of Forth at 11:00." ((5), more)


Quotation contexts and source information

Friday, May 26, 1916

(1) Excerpts from the entry for May 26, 1916,from the memoirs of Maurice Paléologue, French Ambassador to Imperial Russia. Tsar Nicholas and the royal family were increasingly isolated from Russia's elites, the Duma, Russia's legislative assembly, large segments of workers and the military. An autocrat, the Tsar accommodated representative government and the Duma only under duress. He remain in power little more than 40 weeks from the date on which Paléologue wrote.

An Ambassador's Memoirs Vol. II by Maurice Paléologue, page 265, publisher: George H. Doran Company

Saturday, May 27, 1916

(2) Extract from a letter of French Artilleryman Paul Pireaud to his wife Marie on May 27, 1916. Pireaud's unit, the 112th Heavy Artillery Regiment, moved into the Verdun sector in early April. Although French commander Pétain rotated infantry units after seven or eight days, but it was much more difficult to do so with the artillery.

Your Death Would Be Mine; Paul and Marie Pireaud in the Great War by Martha Hanna, page 108, copyright © 2006 by Martha Hanna, publisher: Harvard University Press, publication date: 2006

Sunday, May 28, 1916

(3) In May, 1916 Admiral Sir John Jellicoe commanded the British Grand Fleet, Admiral Reinhard Scheer the German High Sea Fleet. With a superior navy, Britain had cleared the high seas of German warships in the first months of the war, and blockaded the North Sea, constraining the activity of the German surface fleet. On April 25, 1916, German warships had shelled the coastal town of Lowestoft, one of the raids our author refers to, destroying 200 houses, killing three and wounding twelve. The Skaggerak and Kattegat are straits between the North and Baltic Seas, north and east of Denmark's Jutland peninsula. Dogger Bank is a fishing ground in the North Sea, and site of the January 24, 1915 Battle of Dogger Bank as well as an encounter on February 10, 1916. Admiral David Beatty commanded a squadron of battleships that would be used as a lure in the coming days.

A Naval History of World War I by Paul G. Halpern, pp. 314, 315, copyright © 1994 by the United States Naval Institute, publisher: UCL Press, publication date: 1994

Monday, May 29, 1916

(4) Extract from the entry for May 29, 1916 from the writings — diaries, letters, and memoirs — of Captain J.C. Dunn, Medical Officer of the Second Battalion His Majesty's Twenty-Third Foot, the Royal Welch Fusiliers. Dunn was in Cambrin Right, the front line at Cambrin, west of La Bassée, France,in Artois. The previous day he recorded rumors that his unit was moving to Vimy or the Somme.

The War the Infantry Knew 1914-1919 by Captain J.C. Dunn, page 202, copyright © The Royal Welch Fusiliers 1987, publisher: Abacus (Little, Brown and Company, UK), publication date: 1994

Tuesday, May 30, 1916

(5) At the end of May, 1916, the German and British moved into the North Sea with similar plans and deployments: a squadron of half a dozen ships to lure the enemy into the guns of a large battle fleet. Admiral Reinhard Scheer commanded the German High Sea Fleet, and Rear Admiral Franz Hipper his smaller battle squadron. Their British counterparts were Admiral John Jellicoe commanding the Grand Fleet, with David Beatty at the helm of his squadron. Room 40 was home to the British Admiralty cryptographers armed with copies of German code books, one that had been found on the body of a German officer by the Russians. The Jade and Elbe Rivers lead from the ports of Hamburg and Bremerhaven to the North Sea.

A Naval History of World War I by Paul G. Halpern, page 315, copyright © 1994 by the United States Naval Institute, publisher: UCL Press, publication date: 1994


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