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Vladimir Lenin, revolutionary, politician, leader of the Russian Bolshevik Party, head of government of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic and its successor, the Soviet Union. From 'The War of the Nations Portfolio in Rotogravure Etchings Compiled from the Mid-Week Pictorial
Published by the New York Times Co.'
Text:
Nikolai Lenine, Bolshevist Premier of the Soviet Government until arrested by his associate, Trotzky, in 1919.

Vladimir Lenin, revolutionary, politician, leader of the Russian Bolshevik Party, head of government of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic and its successor, the Soviet Union. From 'The War of the Nations Portfolio in Rotogravure Etchings Compiled from the Mid-Week Pictorial
Published by the New York Times Co.' © Copyrighted 1919 by the New York Times Company

Pictures of destruction from East Prussia and the Russian advance of August 1914. General Paul von Hindenburg was brought out of retirement to command German forces in the area, and destroyed the Russian Second Army in the Battle of Tannenberg. With Erich Ludendorff he commanded the army on the Eastern Front before taking supreme command of the German Army in 1916.
Text:
General Feldmarschall v. Hindenburg
Der Befreier von Ostpreußen
Treudeutsche Kriegsgrüsse aus Ostpreußen.
Taplau Pillkallen Stallupönen Uderwangen Lyck

Field Marshal v. Hindenburg
The Liberator of East Prussia
Loyal German War Greetings from East Prussia. 
Taplau Pillkallen Stallupönen Uderwangen Lyck
Reverse:
Kunstanstalt J. Thermal, Posen. Nachdruck verboten.
Nach Originalaufnahmen zur Veröffentlichung genehmigt vom Grossen Generalstab
Hofphotograph Kühlewindt, Königsberg i. Pr.
J. Thermal Art Institute, Posen. Reproduction prohibited. 
After original images approved for publication by the Great General Staff 
Court photographer Kühlewindt, Königsberg in Prussia
Field postmarked January 28, 1916

Pictures of destruction from East Prussia and the Russian advance of August 1914. General Paul von Hindenburg was brought out of retirement to command German forces in the area, and destroyed the Russian Second Army in the Battle of Tannenberg. With Erich Ludendorff he commanded the army on the Eastern Front before taking supreme command of the German Army in 1916.

Gravestone of an unknown soldier of the Seaforth Highlanders, a Scottish regiment, in Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery.
Text:
Cuidich 'n Righ (Aid the King)
A Soldier of the Great War
Seaforth Highlanders
Known Unto God

Gravestone of an unknown soldier of the Seaforth Highlanders, a Scottish regiment, in Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery. © 2013 by John M. Shea

An illustration of the French 75 mm. field artillery cannon in action with portraits of its developers, Deport and Sainte Claire Deville. The sender of the card credits it with the victory of the Marne. Illustration by A. Chrimona [?] Ehrmann [?].
Text:
Le 75. La merveille de la guerre européenne, due au génie inventif de deux officiers français, fait, par la rapidité de son pointage, de son tir (21 coups à la minute) et par sa précision, la supériorité de l'artillerie française.
The 75. The marvel of the European war, due to the inventive genius of two French officers, has proven, ​​by the rapidity of its aiming, of its firing (21 shots per minute) and its accuracy, the superiority of the French artillery .
Reverse:
[Handwritten] Canon de 75
la terreur des Boches
la gloire de l'armée française
le vainqueur de la Marne.
Je vais bien
Je t'embrasse
Édition Pro Patria.
[Handwritten] 75[mm] Cannon
the terror of the Boches
the glory of the French army
the conqueror of Marne.
I'm fine
I embrace you
Pro Patria edition.
Thanks to kgwbreadcrumbs.blogspot.com/2015/07/briefly-along-western-front.html for clarifying some of the text.

An illustration of the French 75 mm. field artillery cannon in action with portraits of its developers, Deport and Sainte Claire Deville. The sender of the card credits it with the victory of the Marne. Illustration by A. Chrimona [?] Ehrmann [?]. Thanks to kgwbreadcrumbs.blogspot.com/2015/07/briefly-along-western-front.html for clarifying some of the text.

A French officer charging into battle in a watercolor by Fernand Rigouts. The original watercolor on deckle-edged watercolor paper is signed F. R. 1917, and addressed to Mademoiselle Henriette Dangon.

A French officer charging into battle in a watercolor by Fernand Rigouts. The original watercolor on deckle-edged watercolor paper is signed F. R. 1917, and addressed to Mademoiselle Henriette Dangon.

Quotations found: 7

Friday, September 17, 1915

"Friday, September 17, 1915.

The strikes have extended to-day to almost all the factories in Petrograd. But no disorder is reported. The leaders say they simply wish to protest against the prorogation of the Duma, and that work will be resumed in two days.

One of my informers, who knows working-class circles well, said to me to-day:

"There's nothing to fear this time either. It's only a general rehearsal."

He added that the ideas of Lenin and his "defeatist" propaganda are making great headway among the educated elements of the working class."
((1), more)

Saturday, September 18, 1915

". . . by September 18[, 1915] the failure of the encircling movement was sealed.

Vilna, of course, was lost to the Russians, and the railway line which went with it, but yet again the salient had been straightened out, and there was little prospect another could be formed. The failure had cost the Germans more than the attempt was worth. The Russians had struck hard at the cavalry at Vilecka on the 23rd, capturing men and eight guns; they inflicted other checks on them at Smorgon and along the line of the Vilia while they made their own retreat good."
((2), more)

Sunday, September 19, 1915

"Many arms of the Service are grouped round the little marble-topped tables, for the district is stiff with British troops, and promises to grow stiffer. In fact, so persistently are the eagles gathering together upon this, the edge of the fighting line, that rumour is busier than ever. The Big Push holds redoubled sway in our thoughts. The First Hundred Thousand are well represented, for the whole Scottish Division is in the neighbourhood. Beside the glengarries there are countless flat caps — line regiments, territorials, gunners, and sappers. The Army Service Corps is there in force, recruiting exhausted nature from the strain of dashing about the country-side in motor-cars. The R.A.M.C. is strongly represented, doubtless to test the purity of the refreshment provided. Even the Staff has torn itself away from its arduous duties for the moment, as sundry red tabs testify. In one corner sit four stout French civilians, playing a mysterious card-game." ((3), more)

Monday, September 20, 1915

"September 18th[, 1915].—Yesterday hot, to-day sweltering; the evenings September 19th—are cool to cold. Our 9.2s are registering; it sounds as if the shell left the muzzle wobbling and steadied itself September 20th—in flight. Heavy and continuous gun-fire in the south is in its second day. The Battle of Loos in the British Army Calendar is the northern extension of a French attack eastwards from the northern end of Vimy Ridge, made in conjunction with an attack northwards in Champagne. In the dressing-station we are told to cotton-wool our ears to-morrow. The Battalion relieved the 57th in Cambrin Right, which is to be its battle-front." ((4), more)

Tuesday, September 21, 1915

"Confident of success, Joffre asked that the size of the coming attack be explained to all soldiers. The explanatory note said: 'Three-quarters of all French forces will participate in the battle. They will be supported by 2,000 heavy [artillery] pieces and 3,000 field pieces for which the provision of munitions surpasses greatly those at the beginning of the war. Every chance of success exists, particularly if one remembers that our recent attack near Arras was made by fifteen divisions and 300 heavy pieces.'" ((5), more)


Quotation contexts and source information

Friday, September 17, 1915

(1) With Tsar Nicholas taking command of the Russian Army, the Tsar and his government prorogued the Duma, Russia's national representative assembly. Two days before, the Ambassador dined with leaders of the Liberal Party who had just heard of the decision. Lenin and the Bolshevik Party argued that the war was an imperialist one, and that Russia should conclude a separate peace with Germany.

An Ambassador's Memoirs Vol. II by Maurice Paléologue, page 77, publisher: George H. Doran Company

Saturday, September 18, 1915

(2) Excerpt from an account by Edwin Grewe of the Germany's last great capture of the Gorlice-Tarnow Offensive. The German attempted to encircle the defenders of Vilna, but the Russians were able to fight their way out. German forces lost 50,000 men in two weeks in taking the city.. Generals Paul von Hindenburg and his chief-of-staff Erich Ludendorff, commanding Germany's armies on the Eastern Front, wanted to continue their offensive, but Commander-in-Chief Erich von Falkenhayn was preparing for an invasion of Serbia and anticipating a French offensive in Champagne.

The Great Events of the Great War in Seven Volumes by Charles F. Horne, Vol. III, 1915, p. 322, copyright © 1920 by The National Alumnia, publisher: The National Alumni, publication date: 1920

Sunday, September 19, 1915

(3) Excerpt from the chapter "The Gathering of the Eagles" in The First Hundred Thousand, by Ian Hay, a soldier in K1, the first 100,000 men of Kitchener's Army, the volunteers who responded to Lord Kitchener's call for volunteers when the United Kingdom went to war in 1914. The soldiers are anticipating and preparing for the Big Push, the Franco-British autumn offensive of 1915. Ian Hay Beith was a Scot,and wore the glengarry, a traditional Scottish bonnet with a toorie or pompom on top and two ribbons trailing behind. The Territorial Force, some units of which wore tam o' shanters, was established as part of the Army reforms of 1906 and '07. Derided here, the Army Service Corps supplied front line troops with food, fuel, weapons, and other supplies. R.A.M.C. is the Royal Army Medical Corps. General Staff officers could be identified by the red tabs on their lapels.

The First Hundred Thousand; Being the Unofficial Chronicle of a Unit of "K (1)" by Ian Hay, pp. 303, 304, publisher: Houghton Mifflin Company, publication date: 1916

Monday, September 20, 1915

(4) Entry for the period September 18 to 20, 1915 from the writings — diaries, letters, and memoirs — of Captain J.C. Dunn, Medical Officer of the Second Battalion His Majesty's Twenty-Third Foot, The Royal Welch Fusiliers. The French had begun their preliminary bombardment for the great allied autumn offensive of 1915. The British would fight the Battle of Loos; the French immediately to their right the Third Battle of Artois. Vimy Ridge had already cost many French lives, and would remain in German hands until Canadian troops took it in April, 1917.

The War the Infantry Knew 1914-1919 by Captain J.C. Dunn, page 149, copyright © The Royal Welch Fusiliers 1987, publisher: Abacus (Little, Brown and Company, UK), publication date: 1994

Tuesday, September 21, 1915

(5) Note of September 21, 1915 from French Commander Joffre prior to his great autumn offensive. The 'recent attack near Arras' was the Second Battle of Artois Jofre had undertaken in May. The September battle was to be the Third. The French preliminary barrage was already underway, although field guns did little damage to entrenchments or entrenched troops. On September 14, in a note to 'the General Officers Commanding Army Groups,' Joffre had pointed out that the number of machine guns had more than doubled, that guns, particularly heavy guns, had large munitions stocks, that motor transport for troops had been expanded, that Kitchener's Army had just disembarked in France, and that British troops would take part 'in large numbers.' The bracketed text is Doughty's emendation.

Pyrrhic Victory; French Strategy and Operations in the Great War by Robert A. Doughty, page 190, copyright © 2005 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College, publisher: Harvard University Press, publication date: 2005


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