TimelineMaps

Follow us through the World War I centennial on Follow wwitoday on Twitter

Triple Entente

German-Austrian War Mill - an Austrian postcard from July or August, 1914.
German and Austro-Hungarian soldiers enjoy the sight of their enemies caught in the arms of a mill of weapons. Serbia, Montenegro, France, Belgium, and Russia whirl. Likely a card from the first days of the war as Great Britain is not included. Illustration by P Gust (?).
Text:
Deutsch-Österreichische Kriegsmühle.
Eigentum und Verlag der Buchdruckerei Julius Lichtner, Wien, 8. Bezirk, Strozzigasse 41.
German-Austrian War mill.
Property and publisher of the book printer Julius Lichtner, Vienna, 8th District, Strozzigasse 41st

German-Austrian War Mill - an Austrian postcard from July or August, 1914.
German and Austro-Hungarian soldiers enjoy the sight of their enemies caught in the arms of a mill of weapons. Serbia, Montenegro, France, Belgium, and Russia whirl. Likely a card from the first days of the war as Great Britain is not included. Illustration by P Gust (?).

Image text

Deutsch-Österreichische Kriegsmühle.



Eigentum und Verlag der Buchdruckerei Julius Lichtner, Wien, 8. Bezirk, Strozzigasse 41.



German-Austrian War mill.



Property and publisher of the book printer Julius Lichtner, Vienna, 8th District, Strozzigasse 41st

Other views: Larger

The Triple Entente of France, Russia, and Great Britain was based on a series of bilateral agreements between the countries including the Anglo-French Entente Cordiale, the Anglo-Russian Convention of 1907, and the Franco-Russian Alliance.

Having a population less than two-thirds that of Germany, France feared facing Germany alone in war, and vigorously fostered close ties with Russia. Should Germany attack France, France hoped to ensure that Russia would strike Germany from the east. To support its ally, France helped finance Russia's recovery after its defeat in the Russo-Japanese war of 1905.

Although Britain and France were the greatest colonial powers and frequently competed, France did not challenge Britain's naval power as Germany did after the turn of the century. Agreements between France and Russia explicitly committed each to militarily assisting the other in the event of war. Although England made no such commitment, British and French military staffs coordinated plans in the event of a European war. Plans included Britain's defense of France's Atlantic ports while the French fleet redeployed to the Mediterranean Sea. It also called for Britain to position an Expeditionary Force on the continent. When war came, the extent of the military planning surprised many members of the British cabinet.