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Zeppelin Kommt! Children play a Zeppelin raid on London. Holding his bomb in the gondola is a doll of the airship's inventor, Count Zeppelin. The other children, playing the English, cower, and the British fleet — folded paper boats — remains in port. Prewar postcards celebrated the imposing airships and the excitement they generated with the same expression, 'Zeppelin Kommt!'. Postcard by P.O. Engelhard (P.O.E.). The message on the reverse is dated May 28, 1915.
Text:
P.O.E.
? England
London
Zeppelin Kommt!
Reverse:
Message dated May 28, 1915
Stamped: Geprüft und zu befördern (Approved and forwarded) 9 Komp. Bay. L.I.N. 5

Zeppelin Kommt! Children play a Zeppelin raid on London. Holding his bomb in the gondola is a doll of the airship's inventor, Count Zeppelin. The other children, playing the English, cower, and the British fleet — folded paper boats — remains in port. Prewar postcards celebrated the imposing airships and the excitement they generated with the same expression, 'Zeppelin Kommt!'. Postcard by P.O. Engelhard (P.O.E.). The message on the reverse is dated May 28, 1915.

Image text: P.O.E.

? England

London

Zeppelin Kommt!



Reverse:

Message dated May 28, 1915



Stamped: Geprüft und zu befördern (Approved and forwarded) 9 Komp. Bay. L.I.N. 5

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The rulers of the Central Powers stumped by Verdun. Franz Joseph of Austria-Hungary, Mohammed V of Turkey, Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, and Czar Ferdinand of Bulgaria puzzle over a map labeled "Verdun." The ink and watercolor drawing is dated March 4, 1916. By R. DLC?
The German assault on Verdun began on February 21, 1916 and continued through August.
Reverse:
Postmarked Bern, Switzerland, March 7, 1916 7.III.16.)

The rulers of the Central Powers stumped by Verdun. Franz Joseph of Austria-Hungary, Mohammed V of Turkey, Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, and Czar Ferdinand of Bulgaria puzzle over a map labeled "Verdun." The ink and watercolor drawing is dated March 4, 1916. By R. DLC?
The German assault on Verdun began on February 21, 1916 and continued through August.

Image text: Illustrated map labeled "Verdun." Drawing dated March 4, 1916. By R. DLC?

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Portrait postcard of Admiral Sir John Jellicoe of the Royal Navy. Appointed Commander of the British Home Fleets on August 2, 1914, Jellicoe was criticized for his leadership of the British fleet during the May 31, 1916 Battle of Jutland in which he failed to decisively defeat the German High Seas Fleet. He was made First Sea Lord later that year. The card was postmarked from Glasgow, Scotland, on January 7, 1915.
Text:
Admiral Sir John Jellicoe

Portrait postcard of Admiral Sir John Jellicoe of the Royal Navy. Appointed Commander of the British Home Fleets on August 2, 1914, Jellicoe was criticized for his leadership of the British fleet during the May 31, 1916 Battle of Jutland in which he failed to decisively defeat the German High Seas Fleet. He was made First Sea Lord later that year. The card was postmarked from Glasgow, Scotland, on January 7, 1915.

Image text: Admiral Sir John Jellicoe

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What do you want here? Turkish and British child soldiers on the Suez Canal. After crossing the Sinai Peninsula during January, 1915, a Turkish army of approximately 12,000 soldiers reached the Suez Canal on February 2, and tried to cross after nightfall, but were driven back. On the 3rd, the British crossed the canal, and struck the Turkish left flank, driving them back. By February 10, the Turks had evacuated the Peninsula. 
Text:
Was willst Du hier?
Suez-Kanal
Reverse:
A.R. & C.i.B. No. 718/4

What do you want here? Turkish and British child soldiers on the Suez Canal. After crossing the Sinai Peninsula during January, 1915, a Turkish army of approximately 12,000 soldiers reached the Suez Canal on February 2, and tried to cross after nightfall, but were driven back. On the 3rd, the British crossed the canal, and struck the Turkish left flank, driving them back. By February 10, the Turks had evacuated the Peninsula.

Image text: Was willst Du hier?



What do you want here?



Suez-Kanal



Reverse:

A.R. & C.i.B. No. 718/4

Other views: Larger

Thursday, March 4, 1915

"On February 26 [1915], LZ.8 commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Beelitz, left her shed at Düsseldorf and headed for England, but strong headwinds forced her to land at an Army encampment field in occupied Belgium. On March 4 Beelitz tried again, but was trapped by a North Sea gale and blown out of control over Nieuport, and his brand new Zeppelin was shot down by Belgian gunners." ((1), more)

Saturday, March 4, 1916

"1916

965. A fateful year. At the end of January, Louis Moilliet's wife died while giving birth to a son, her first child. On March 4th my friend Franz Marc fell at Verdun. On March 11th I was drafted at the age of thirty-five."
((2), more)

Sunday, March 4, 1917

"Visit from Admiral Jellicoe.

A real sailor and a real Anglo-Saxon.

He takes a serious view of the situation as a result of the submarine war. In February 500,000 tons were sunk, and against this between eight and ten enemy submarines were destroyed. It is extremely difficult to know when a submarine has been sunk. . . .

The Germans are beginning to lack experienced officers."
((3), more)

Monday, March 4, 1918

"March 4 [1918]

 Posted to 25th R.W.F. to-day. Moved across to Yeomanry Base Camp. Another day of arid sunshine and utter blankness. This place is the absolute visible expression of time wasted at the war. The sand and the huts and the tents and the faces, all are meaningless. Just a crowd of people killing time. Time wasted in waste places. I wish I could see some meaning in it all. But it is soul-less. And it seems an intolerable burden—to everyone, as to me.

 People go 'up the line' almost gladly—for it means there's some purpose in life. People who remain here scheme to 'get leave'. And, having got it, go aimlessly off to Cairo, Port Said, or Ismailia, to spend their money on eating and drinking and being bored, and looking for lust."
((4), more)

Quotation contexts and source information

Thursday, March 4, 1915

(1) Zeppelins had been used in the sieges of the Belgian fortress cities of Liège and Antwerp in 1914, and against cities in France and Russia. The first raids on Great Britain took place the night of January 19-20, 1915, striking the cities of Sheringham, Snettisham, King's Lynn, and Yarmouth. The prevailing winds over the North Sea worked against the German airships which were vulnerable to bad weather. Two were wrecked over neutral Denmark on February 17.

The Zeppelin Fighters by Arch Whitehouse, page 72, copyright © 1966 by Arch Whitehouse, publisher: New English Library, publication date: 1978

Saturday, March 4, 1916

(2) Excerpt from the diary of the Swiss-German painter Paul Klee. Louis Moilliet was a Swiss painter and stained glass artist. Franz Marc was a leading figure in Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) group of primarily Russian and German artists. Horses were one of Marc's most frequent subjects. In his Complete History, Martin Gilbert quotes one of Marc's last letters: 'The poor horses!' In one day at Verdun, 7,000 horses were killed.

The Diaries of Paul Klee 1898-1918, Edited, with an Introduction by Felix Klee by Paul Klee, page 323, copyright © 1964 by the Regents of the University of California, publisher: University of California Press, publication date: 1968

Sunday, March 4, 1917

(3) Entry from the war diary of Albert, King of the Belgians, March 4, 1917, on his visit from Admiral Sir John Jellicoe, Great Britain's First Sea Lord. Germany had resumed its policy of unrestricted submarine warfare on February 1 in an attempt to starve Britain into submission. 500,000 tons was a significant increase over the average of 320,000 in the preceding four months, a period in which the Allies sank only ten submarines in all theaters. Jellicoe overestimates the Allies' success in destroying U-boats. Halpern, in his A Naval History of World War I, writes that, 'in February, March, and April the Germans lost only nine submarines' (p. 341).

The War Diaries of Albert I King of the Belgians by Albert I, pp. 156–157, copyright © 1954, publisher: William Kimber

Monday, March 4, 1918

(4) Excerpt from the diary of Siegfried Sassoon, a British poet, author, Second Lieutenant in the Royal Welch Fusiliers (R.W.F.), and recipient of the Military Cross for gallantry in action. During February, 1918 Sassoon traveled from Limerick, Ireland to Southhampton, England, across the English Channel to Cherbourg, France, continuing across France through Lyon by train to and across Italy's Adriatic coast, following it south to Taranto before crossing the Mediterranean Sea to Alexandria, Egypt. Egypt was the base of operations for British operations in Palestine. Sassoon had been wounded in April, 1917, and by mid-June had concluded that the war begun 'as a war of defence and liberation, [had] become a war of aggression and conquest.' In October he was at Craiglockhart, a psychiatric facility in Scotland, and under the care of W. H. R. Rivers. There he met the poet Wilfred Owen and edited some of his poems, a relationship at the heart of Regeneration, the first book of Pat Barker's WWI trilogy of the same name.

Siegfried Sassoon Diaries 1915-1918 by Siegfried Sassoon, page 219, copyright © George Sassoon, 1983; Introduction and Notes Rupert Hart-Davis, 1983, publisher: Faber and Faber, publication date: 1983