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Battle of the Piave

Headstones in the Portuguese Cemetery in Neuve Chapelle, France. Portugal joined the Entente Allies in 1917. They were on the front line in %+%Event%m%97%n%Operation Georgette%-%, the German Lys Offensive, the second German drive of 1918. The Cemetery is across a field from the Indian Memorial visible in the background. Nearby is the Laventie German Cemetery.

Headstones in the Portuguese Cemetery in Neuve Chapelle, France. Portugal joined the Entente Allies in 1917. They were on the front line in Operation Georgette, the German Lys Offensive, the second German drive of 1918. The Cemetery is across a field from the Indian Memorial visible in the background. Nearby is the Laventie German Cemetery. © 2014 by John M. Shea

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After the disaster at Caparetto, and the replacement of Luigi Cadorna with General Armando Diaz, the Italian position and morale strengthened. In early 1918, in preparation for its Western Front offensives, the Germans withdrew their forces from Italy. Absent German officers and troops, Austria-Hungary made its bid to defeat Italy.

Conrad von Hötzendorf, replaced as Austro-Hungarian Chief of the General Staff, commanded the Austro-Hungarian Tenth Army in Trentino. Boroevic commanded the ???.

On June 13, the Austro-Hungarians [Conrad?] launched a diversionary attack [from Trentino?] at the Tonale Pass near the Swiss border.

Two days later, on June 15, 1918, the Austro-Hungarians launched the Battle of the Piave with the Fifth, Sixth, Eleventh, and Tenth Armies / Austria-Hungary attacked Italy [from Trentino and] along the Piave, Conrad 11th Army, and Boroević. Boroević crossed??? the Piave along a front of ??? over 20 miles, but Allied air attacks and high water made it difficult for him to resupply his forces. Austro-Hungarian planes were no match for the Allies: water-cooled engines froze and incendiary bullets ignited the planes' fabric. On June 20, 1918, Kaiser Karl called off attack. Boroević withdrew during the night of June 22-23.

Austria-Hungary destroyed much of its remaining military power in the battle. It had sent its last 29 supply trains to the front. It had lost 269 of 382 planes. Its machine guns froze.

Austria-Hungary suffered 100,000 casualties [Map 44 says 150,000]. Herwig p. 370. – Between June 15 and 25, Austria-Hungary lost 142,550 men, including 11,643 dead, and 24,474 prisoners of war. Allies: 84,830 including 8,030 dead.

1918-06-15

1918-06-23