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Messines Ridge

View across No Man's Land between Ypres and Messines in 1917 by Lance Corporal Hugh F. Ward, 97th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps. Ward painted this while he was in the sector before, during, and after the June, 1917 Battle of Messines Ridge. Initialed 'H.W.'.

View across No Man's Land between Ypres and Messines in 1917 by Lance Corporal Hugh F. Ward, 97th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps. Ward painted this while he was in the sector before, during, and after the June, 1917 Battle of Messines Ridge. Initialed 'H.W.'.

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Initialed 'H.W.'.

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Messines Ridge

From Messines Ridge the Germans could observe British preparations. The Germans had ample warning of the coming attack, and launched an attack at the coast on July 10, 1917, taking some territory. In the flat landscape, Haig’s preparations were in view. Two weeks of bombardment – 4,500,000 shells from 3,000 guns – eliminated any element of surprise that might have remained. Herwig, p. 330, 30,000 German casualties in bombardment.

At 3:10 AM on June 7, 1917 19 explosions lifted and brought down (Wytschaete) Messines Ridge in Belgium????? For ??? ???? had tunneled beneath the ridge, then packed them with explosives. The explosion was felt in London, ??? miles away, and heard in ????.

(Wytschaete) Messines Ridge, tunnels dug beneath it for ??? At 3:10 AM on June 7, 1917 19 explosions lifted and brought down the ridge. Heard in . . . Felt in London …. A true weapon of siege, as AJP Taylor notes, blowing up the defensive ridge as besiegers had undermined (THE ORIGIN OF THE WORD?) and blown literally up, and brought down the walls of castles [at ??? or ???].

1917-06-07

1917-06-14