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Panorama of the Western theater of war 1914/15 from Compiègne to Arras, with the North Sea coast in the distance.
Reverse:
Panorama des westlichen Kriegschauplatzes 1914/15 von Compiegne bis Arras.
Die Panorama-Postkartenreihe umfaßt mit ihren 9 Abschnitten Nr. 400 bis 408 den gesamten westlichen Kriegschauplatz von der Schewizer Grenze bis zur Nordseeküste.
Panorama of the Western theater of war 1914/15 from Compiègne to Arras.
The panoramic postcard series includes with their 9 sections No. 400 to 408 the entire western front from the Schewizer border to the North Sea coast.
Nr. 407
Wenau-Postkarte Patentamtl. gesch.
Logo: W&N AGL

Panorama of the Western theater of war 1914/15 from Compiègne to Arras, with the North Sea coast in the distance.

Image text

Reverse:

Panorama des westlichen Kriegschauplatzes 1914/15 von Compiegne bis Arras.

Die Panorama-Postkartenreihe umfaßt mit ihren 9 Abschnitten Nr. 400 bis 408 den gesamten westlichen Kriegschauplatz von der Schewizer Grenze bis zur Nordseeküste.

Panorama of the Western theater of war 1914/15 from Compiègne to Arras.

The panoramic postcard series includes with their 9 sections No. 400 to 408 the entire western front from the Schewizer border to the North Sea coast.

Nr. 407

Wenau-Postkarte Patentamtl. gesch.

Logo: W&N AGL

Other views: Larger, Larger, Back

Tuesday, March 26, 1918

"General Foch is charged by the British and French governments with coördinating the action of the Allied armies on the western front. To this end he will come to an understanding with the commanders in chief, who are requested to furnish him with all necessary information. . . .

Instead of a British battle to cover the Channel ports and a French battle to cover Paris, we would fight an Anglo-French battle to cover Amiens, the connecting link between the two armies."

Quotation Context

The first paragraph is from the agreement signed by Lord Alfred Milner, a member of the British War Cabinet, and French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau on March 26, 1918, appointing General Ferdinand Foch commander over the French and British Armies on the Western Front to ensure the two did not separate and fall back to the the national capital or the evacuation ports for transfer to Britain. The second paragraph is a summary of Foch's immediate plan, first sent to Clemenceau two days earlier. The 'commanders in chief' were British General Douglas Haig and French General Henri Philippe Pétain. Amiens was a critical communication center in northern France. Germany's Operation Michael, the Somme Offensive, was on the verge of breaking the Allied line and seizing Amiens.

Source

The Memoirs of Marshal Foch, translated by Col. T. Bentley Mott by Ferdinand Foch, pp. 264, 265, copyright © 1931 by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., publisher: Doubleday, Doran & Co., publication date: 1931

Tags

1918-03-26, 1918, March, Foch, Clemenceau, Ferdinand Foch, George Clemenceau, Milner, Alfred Milner, Amiens, Channel ports