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Antonio Salandra

Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany calls for God's judgement on 'the instigators of the World War' - the leaders of the Entente Allies - as the soldiers and civilians, the mourning and the wounded, of both sides plead for aid. At the center of the accused stands British Foreign Secretary Edward Grey. To the right kneels Serbian Prime Minister Pashitch with Crown Prince Alexander behind him. To the left Briand of France and Salandra of Italy.
Text:
Gottesgericht über die Anstifter des Weltkrieges.
Vom Oberkommando in den Marken, Berlin zur Veröffentlichung zugelassen am 24. Dezember 1914.
Vom Pressbureau des Kriegsministeriums genehmigt. Wien, 18. Januar 1915.
Franz Heinrich, Kunstverlag, Berlin N 24, Oranienburger Str. 60/63. Gesetzlich geschützt. Nachahmung auf Grund des gesetzlichen Schutzes streng verboten.
F. Brückmann, Fl-G., München.
God's judgment upon the instigators of the World War.
Approved for publication by the High Command in the Marches District, Berlin on December 24, 1914.
Approved by the Press Bureau of the War Department. Vienna, January 18, 1915
Reverse:
Franz Heinrich, Art Publisher, Berlin N 24, Oranienburger Str. 60/63. Protected by law. Legally protected against counterfeiting which is strictly prohibited.
F. Bruckmann, Fl-G., Munich.
Message and postmark July 13, 1915.

Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany calls for God's judgement on 'the instigators of the World War' - the leaders of the Entente Allies - as the soldiers and civilians, the mourning and the wounded, of both sides plead for aid. At the center of the accused stands British Foreign Secretary Edward Grey. To the right kneels Serbian Prime Minister Pashitch with Crown Prince Alexander behind him. To the left Briand of France and Salandra of Italy.

Image text

Gottesgericht über die Anstifter des Weltkrieges.



Vom Oberkommando in den Marken, Berlin zur Veröffentlichung zugelassen am 24. Dezember 1914.

Vom Pressbureau des Kriegsministeriums genehmigt. Wien, 18. Januar 1915.



God's judgment upon the instigators of the World War.



Approved for publication by the High Command in the Marches District, Berlin on December 24, 1914.

Approved by the Press Bureau of the War Department. Vienna, January 18, 1915



Reverse:

Franz Heinrich, Kunstverlag, Berlin N 24, Oranienburger Str. 60/63. Gesetzlich geschützt. Nachahmung auf Grund des gesetzlichen Schutzes streng verboten.

F. Brückmann, Fl-G., München.



Franz Heinrich, Art Publisher, Berlin N 24, Oranienburger Str. 60/63. Protected by law. Legally protected against counterfeiting which is strictly prohibited.

F. Bruckmann, Fl-G., Munich.



Message and postmark July 13, 1915.

Other views: Larger, Larger, Back

Antonio Salandra became Italian Prime Minister in March 1914. His government declared Italian neutrality on August 3, citing the defensive nature of the Triple Alliance. The alliance called for its members to come to the aid of a partner who was attacked by two or more Great Powers. Italy, still recovering from its war seizing present-day Libya from the Ottoman Empire in 1911 and 1912, determined that Austria’s attack on Serbia did not meet this condition.

Although it had territorial disputes with France in Piedmont, those with Austria-Hungary were more significant, as there were great numbers of ethnic Italians living under Austrian rule in the the southern Tyrol (Trentino-Alto Adige) and Trieste. There was little support for entering the war on the side Austria-Hungary.

Italy was sharply divided between neutrality and joining the Entente Allies. After the Russian victory at Przemyśl on March 23, 1915, many thought Italy should enter the war before Russia defeated Austria-Hungary with no benefit to Italy. On April 26, Italy, Great Britain, and France signed the secret Treaty of London, in which Italy agreed to enter the war, and Britain agreed to supply Italy with coal. On May 4, 1915 Italy formally abrogated the Triple Alliance.

A majority of the Chamber of Deputies favored neutrality and forced the cabinet to resign on May 13. Salandra returned to power three days later as rising support for intervention - including a mob that gathered at the Parliament House and smashed some of its windows - helped the Deputies decide to vote for war. On May 23, 1915, Italy declared war on Austria-Hungary.

Salandra played little part in the military plans of Italian Commander-in-Chief Luigi Cadorna.

Salandra's government resigned on June 10, 1916, after Austria-Hungary's Asiago Offensive.

Italy

Roles held by Antonio Salandra

Role Start Date End Date
Head of Government (e.g., Prime Minister)