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The Second Battle of the Marne (The Aisne-Marne Offensive)

Victory Monument commemorating the Eighth Regiment of the Illinois National Guard, an African-American unit that served in France reorganized as the 370th U.S. Infantry Regiment of the 93rd Division. The bronze sculpture is by Leonard Crunelle and was erected in 1927.
The regiment saw action at St. Mihiel, the Argonne Forest, Mont des Singes, and in the Oise-Aisne Offensive. The monument lists the names of the 137 soldiers of the regiment who lost their lives in the war.

Victory Monument commemorating the Eighth Regiment of the Illinois National Guard, an African-American unit that served in France reorganized as the 370th U.S. Infantry Regiment of the 93rd Division. The bronze sculpture is by Leonard Crunelle and was erected in 1927.
The regiment saw action at St. Mihiel, the Argonne Forest, Mont des Singes, and in the Oise-Aisne Offensive. The monument lists the names of the 137 soldiers of the regiment who lost their lives in the war. © 2013, John M. Shea

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The French had ample warning from prisoners and air reconnaissance of Ludendorff's preparations for the Champagne-Marne Offensive, the Fifth German drive of 1918. General Foch prepared a counter-attack for July 18. He had available 750 tanks, 1,000 aircraft, and three French armies that included American and Italian divisions. Foch moved an additional French army into position on July 17, concealing it in a forest.

In their offensive, two German armies attempted??? to drive south, crossing??? the Marne and encircling Rheims. The Allies retreated before the German advance, but formed a pocket anchored on either side.

On July 18, the French counter-attacked with several hundred RENAULT ???? tanks and no preparatory artillery barrage, first on one flank, then on the other, catching the Germans unaware. The Allies advanced four miles on the first day, taking 25,000 Germans prisoner. Retreating to escape the trap, the Germans shortened and strengthened their line.

Ludendorff ordered a general retreat, falling back to the north, relinquishing his gains of the previous months. The Germans were running out of supplies and men as desertions skyrocketed, and reserves stopped reporting to the front. German casualties were staggering: 420,000 dead and wounded and 340,000 captured or missing.

1918-07-18

1918-08-06