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The Allied Retreat of 1914

Postcard report and map of an Austrian victory at Krasnik on August 26, 1914. The three-day %+%Event%m%122%n%Battle of Krasnik%-%, an Austro-Hungarian victory, began on August 23, 1914 when General Dankl leading the Austro-Hungarian First Army,  advancing, struck the Russian Fourth Army, and drove them back towards Lublin. Russia is shown in green, Austria-Hungary yellow, and Germany blue.
Text:
Österreichische Siege, 26. 8. 1914
Das österreichische Kriegspressequartier meldet: Westlich der Weichsel errichten unsere Kräfte im Anschluß an die deutschen Verbündeten unter kleinen Kämpfen gestern den Abschnitt des Komionka Flussen zwischen Kielce und Radom. Oestlich der Weichsel warfen unsere Siegreich vordringenden Kräfte am 23 August bei Krasnit auf dem Wege nach Lublin eine starke Gruppe zweier russischer Korps zurück. Ueber 1000 Russen, darunter viele Offiziere, fielen unverwundet in unsere Hände. Eine Anzahl Fahnen, Maschinengewehre und Geschütze wurden erbeutet. (19)
Austrian victories, 26 8th 1914
The Austrian war press bureau reports: West of the Vistula our forces were increased by the addition of our German allies in fighting yesterday at the section of the Komionka River between Kielce and Radom. East of the Vistula our victorious forces advanced on 23 August at Krasnik, and drove a strong group of two Russian corps back to Lublin. About 1,000 Russians, including many officers, fell uninjured into our hands. A number of flags, rifles and machine guns were captured. (19)
Reverse:
Message dated February 7, 1915. Field postmark 9 Res. Div.
B.Z. Kriegskarte
Verlag der B.Z. am Mittag, Berlin
B.Z. War card
Publishing the B.Z. at noon, Berlin

Postcard report and map of an Austrian victory at Krasnik on August 26, 1914. The three-day Battle of Krasnik, an Austro-Hungarian victory, began on August 23, 1914 when General Dankl leading the Austro-Hungarian First Army, advancing, struck the Russian Fourth Army, and drove them back towards Lublin. Russia is shown in green, Austria-Hungary yellow, and Germany blue.

Image text

Österreichische Siege, 26. 8. 1914

Das österreichische Kriegspressequartier meldet: Westlich der Weichsel errichten unsere Kräfte im Anschluß an die deutschen Verbündeten unter kleinen Kämpfen gestern den Abschnitt des Komionka Flussen zwischen Kielce und Radom. Oestlich der Weichsel warfen unsere Siegreich vordringenden Kräfte am 23 August bei Krasnik auf dem Wege nach Lublin eine starke Gruppe zweier russischer Korps zurück. Ueber 1000 Russen, darunter viele Offiziere, fielen unverwundet in unsere Hände. Eine Anzahl Fahnen, Maschinengewehre und Geschütze wurden erbeutet. (19)



Austrian victories, 26 8th 1914

The Austrian war press bureau reports: West of the Vistula our forces were increased by the addition of our German allies in fighting yesterday at the section of the Komionka River between Kielce and Radom. East of the Vistula our victorious forces advanced on 23 August at Krasnik, and drove a strong group of two Russian corps back to Lublin. About 1,000 Russians, including many officers, fell uninjured into our hands. A number of flags, rifles and machine guns were captured. (19)



Reverse:

Message dated February 7, 1915. Field postmark 9 Res. Div.



B.Z. Kriegskarte

Verlag der B.Z. am Mittag, Berlin



B.Z. War card

Publishing the B.Z. at noon, Berlin



SEE HERWIG, PP. 92, 93

Other views: Larger, Larger, Back

Victorious in the Battle of the Frontiers, five German armies advanced through northern France driving three French Armies and the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) before them.

As the Allies retreated, French General Joffre reconfigured his forces, strengthening and extending his left, held by the BEF, creating the Sixth Army.

The German offensive was weakened as troops were drawn off to besiege two French fortresses and the Belgian fortress of Antwerp. Commander von Moltke also sent two army corps east to aid the war against Russia.

On August 26, one corps of the BEF fought the Battle of Le Cateau. On August 29, the Germans struck the French Fifth Army in the Battle of Guise. In both cases, the retreating Allies were dangerously isolated, and at peril of being outflanked.

Joffre, seeking a line on which to stop the Germans, struggled to keep the British in the field, as British commander Sir John French considered retreating to the coast and Britain.

Following its war plan, the First German Army advanced to the southwest to envelop Paris. On August 31, as the German Second Army stayed in position, the First Army commander, convinced the British had fled, and that he had no significant French forces on his right, turned to the southeast, advancing rapidly to envelop the French Fifth Army. On September 1, a 30-mile gap separated the two German armies.

The French government fled Paris on September 2, giving command of the city's defense to General Gallieni. The new French Sixth Army retreated to the strongly fortified city.

Joffre repeatedly asked his commanders when they would be ready to counter-attack. Franchet d’Esperey, new commander of the Fifth Army, would be ready on September 6. On September 5, German forces encountered the Sixth Army advancing from Paris, and realized their danger.

1914-08-23

1914-09-05

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The Allied Retreat