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Battle of the Frontiers or Borders

Map of Alsace and the Franco-German border from Switzerland north along the Vosges Mountains to Strasbourg. The postcard celebrates the German victory at Mulhouse August 11, 1914, retaking the city from the French.
Text:
Der Sieg bei Mülhausen 11.8.1914
Der Große Generalstab veröffentlicht folgende Meldung: Von Belfort in das Oberelsass nach Mülhausen vor gedrungener Feind, anscheinend das VII, französische Armeekorps und eine Infanterie-Division der Besatzung von Belfort, sind heute von unseren Truppen aus einer verstärkten Stellung westlich Mülhausen in südlicher Richtung zurückgeworfen worden. Verluste unserer Truppen nicht erheblich, die der Franzosen groß.
The victory at Mulhouse 08/11/1914
The Great General Staff issued the following message: From Belfort in Upper Alsace to Mulhouse, our troops have thrown back strong enemy forces – apparently the VII French army corps and one infantry division of the garrison of Belfort – from their reinforced position west of Mulhouse to the south. Losses to our troops are not significant, and comparable to those of the French.
W.I.B. (4)
Reverse:
B.Z. Kriegskarte
Verlag der B.Z. am Mittag, Berlin (Publishing the B.Z. at noon, Berlin)

Map of Alsace and the Franco-German border from Switzerland north along the Vosges Mountains to Strasbourg. The postcard celebrates the German victory at Mulhouse on August 11, 1914, retaking the city from the French. © 1914-08-11

Image text

Der Sieg bei Mülhausen 11.8.1914

Der Große Generalstab veröffentlicht folgende Meldung: Von Belfort in das Oberelsass nach Mülhausen vor gedrungener Feind, anscheinend das VII, französische Armeekorps und eine Infanterie-Division der Besatzung von Belfort, sind heute von unseren Truppen aus einer verstärkten Stellung westlich Mülhausen in südlicher Richtung zurückgeworfen worden. Verluste unserer Truppen nicht erheblich, die der Franzosen groß.



The victory at Mulhouse 08/11/1914

The Great General Staff issued the following message: From Belfort in Upper Alsace to Mulhouse, our troops have thrown back strong enemy forces – apparently the VII French army corps and one infantry division of the garrison of Belfort – from their reinforced position west of Mulhouse to the south. Losses to our troops are not significant, and comparable to those of the French.

W.I.B. (4)



Reverse:

B.Z. Kriegskarte

Verlag der B.Z. am Mittag, Berlin (Publishing the B.Z. at noon, Berlin)

Other views: Larger, Larger

The "Battle of the Borders" might be a clearer term, the battles on the borders of France and Germany, and France and Belgium, the initial execution of the French and German war plans, with France's attempt to drive into Germany across their shared border, and Germany’s invasion of neutral Belgium to strike France along its Belgian border and seize Paris.

General Joseph Joffre, commanding French forces, expected two German drives, the first advancing west directly into his forces in Alsace-Lorraine, and the second into Belgium before turning south into France relatively quickly. He resisted the notion the Germans would advance across most of Belgium before turning into northern France.

The French were initially successful in attacks by the First and Second Armies into Alsace, capturing, but then losing, the city of Mulhouse.

On August 14, north of Alsace, two French armies advanced into Lorraine, before being driven back by two German armies.

The German plan had called for a fighting retreat on the left wing to lure the French forward, while the right wing moved rapidly across Belgium. In driving the French back, the German counter-attacks gave the French an opportunity to regroup.

Joffre next attacked on August 20 with three French armies in and west of the Ardennes Forest, thinking two of the armies could cross the Forest before facing German forces. He was mistaken, his attack failed, and the French retreated.

At the western end of the French line, the French Fifth Army faced three German armies, and had only the British Expeditionary Force on its left. As the French retreated, the British first stood at Mons, the first British engagement of the war, then retreated as well.

The Belgian Army had retired to Antwerp, and their allies, Britain and France, were on the verge of begin driven entirely from Belgium.

1914-08-07

1914-08-23

More about Battle of the Frontiers or Borders:

The Battle of the Frontiers