TimelineMapsSearch QuotationsSearch Images

Follow us through the World War I centennial and beyond at Follow wwitoday on Twitter

Quotation Search

This page uses cookies to store search terms.

Quotation Context Tags

An English postcard of a Zeppelin with the face of Kaiser Wilhelm coming down in flames.
Text:
Coming down!
Reverse:
Message dated 11 Abril [1]918

An English postcard of a Zeppelin with the face of Kaiser Wilhelm coming down in flames.

German pilot Kleim with his observer, ground crew, and LVG bi-plane. Kleim is marked with an 'x' above his head, standing, outer coat open, hands on his hips. The plane may be an early model C.II introduced in late 1915. It has wire wheels of the earlier B.I, and what may be an early exhaust pipe. The more typical C.II positions the exhaust at the midpoint of the engine.
Text:
[Trans:] My Aircraft
Kleim L.V.G.

German pilot Kleim with his observer, ground crew, and LVG bi-plane. Kleim is marked with an 'x' above his head, standing, outer coat open, hands on his hips. The plane may be an early model C.II introduced in late 1915. It has wire wheels of the earlier B.I, and what may be an early exhaust pipe. The more typical C.II positions the exhaust at the midpoint of the engine.

Allied soldiers fortifying shell craters after an advance. From The Nations at War by Willis J. Abbot, 1918 Edition.
Text:
A startling new situation confronted the Allies in their recent advance against the Germans. They are fortifying in a concealed way chains of shell craters due to intensive artillery firing of months.

Allied soldiers fortifying shell craters after an advance. From The Nations at War by Willis J. Abbot, 1918 Edition.

Emperor Karl of Austria-Hungary, his wife Zita, and their son Crown Prince Otto in the funeral cortege of Emperor Franz Josef. Tsar Ferdinand of Bulgaria walks behind them. Franz Joseph died November 21, 1916, and was buried on November 30.
Text:
Der Kaiserpaar mit dem Kronprinzen u. der König von Bulgarien im Leichenzuge Kaiser Franz Josef I.
The imperial couple with the Crown Prince and the King of Bulgaria in the funeral procession of Emperor Franz Joseph I.
Reverse:
Nach Photographien des Pressedienstes des k.u.k. Kriegsministeriums. 1916
After photographs of the press service of the k.u.k. [kaiserlich und königlich - imperial and royal] War Ministry. 1916

Emperor Karl of Austria-Hungary, his wife Zita, and their son Crown Prince Otto in the funeral cortege of Emperor Franz Josef. Tsar Ferdinand of Bulgaria walks behind them. Franz Joseph died November 21, 1916, and was buried on November 30.

Postwar postcard map of the Balkans including Albania, newly-created Yugoslavia, expanded Romania, and diminished former Central Powers Bulgaria and Turkey. The first acquisitions of Greece in its war against Turkey are seen in Europe where it advanced almost to Constantinople, in the Aegean Islands from Samos to Rhodes, and on the Turkish mainland from its base in Smyrna. The Greco-Turkish war was fought from May 1919 to 1922. The positions shown held from the war's beginning to the summer of 1920 when Greece advanced eastward. Newly independent Hungary and Ukraine appear in the northwest and northeast.
Text:
Péninsule des Balkans
Échelle 1:12.000.000
Petit Atlas de Poche Universel
25 Édition Jeheber Genève
Reverse:
No. 20  Édition Jeheber, Genève (Suisse)
Balkans

Roumanie
(Royaume.)
Superficie . . . 290 000 sq. km.
Population . . . 16 000 000 hab. (50 par sq. km.
Capitale: Bucarest . . . 338 000 hab.

Bulgarie
(Royaume.)
Superficie . . . 100 000 sq. km.
Population . . . 4 000 000 hab. (40 par sq. km.)
Capitale: Sofia . . . 103 000 hab.

Grèce
(Royaume. Capitale: Athènes.)
En Europe (y compris la Crète et les iles) 200 000 sq. km. 6 000 000 hab. 30 p. sq. km.
En Asie mineure . . . 30 000 sq. km 1 300 000 hab. 43 p. sq. km.
Total 230 000 sq. km. 7 300 000 hab. 32 p. sq. km.
Ville de plus de 50 000 habitants:
Smyrne (Asie) . . . 350 000 hab.
Athènes . . . 175 000 hab.
Salonique . . . 150 000
Andrinople . . . 70 000 hab.
Pirée . . . 70 000 hab.

Turquie d'Europe
(Empire Ottoman.)
Superficie . . . 2 000 sq. km.
Population . . . 1 100 000 550 par sq. km.
Capitale: Constantinople 1 000 000 hab.

Albanie
Superficie . . . 30 000 sq. km.
Population . . . 800 000 hab. (27 par sq. km.)
Villes: Scutari . . . 30 000 hab.
Durazzo . . . 5 000 hab.

Yougoslavie
Voir le tableau des statisques de ce pays, ainsi que la carte de la partie occidentale de la Yougoslavie, sur la carte d'Italie.

Inst. Géog. Kummerl

Postwar postcard map of the Balkans including Albania, newly-created Yugoslavia, expanded Romania, and diminished former Central Powers Bulgaria and Turkey. The first acquisitions of Greece in its war against Turkey are seen in Europe where it advanced almost to Constantinople, in the Aegean Islands from Samos to Rhodes, and on the Turkish mainland from its base in Smyrna. The Greco-Turkish war was fought from May 1919 to 1922. The positions shown held from the war's beginning to the summer of 1920 when Greece advanced eastward. Newly independent Hungary and Ukraine appear in the northwest and northeast.

Quotations found: 7

Monday, November 27, 1916

"I flew toward the Zepp and flew at right angles to and underneath him amidships, firing as I went under. I then turned sharply east, the Zepp turning east also. We then flew on a parallel course for about five miles and I fired 71 rounds at the Zepp. I estimated his ground speed to be approximately 70 mph. I was aiming at his port quarter and noticed first a small patch become incandescent where I had seen tracers entering his envelope. I first took it for a machine gun firing at me from the Zepp, but this patch rapidly spread and the next thing was that the whole Zepp was in flames. I landed at 12 midnight (British Time), engine and machine O.K. The Zeppelin which fell into the mouth of the Tees was still burning when I landed." ((1), more)

Tuesday, November 28, 1916

"On November 27 seven Zeppelins raided England, dropping more than two hundred bombs. Two of the raiders were shot down: in one of them, hit by the incendiary bullets fired by a British pilot, all twenty crewmen were killed. On the following day a single German seaplane flew over London, dropping six bombs on Kensington. 'I heard the explosions from the Foreign Office and thought they were practising with rifles at Wellington Barracks,' one senior diplomat, Lord Harding, later recalled. No one was killed, but six civilians were wounded. The raid marked the first aircraft as opposed to Zeppelin attack in the capital." ((2), more)

Wednesday, November 29, 1916

"During those five days the torrential rain and snow never let up. The walls of the trench were sagging; the precarious shelters which men had dug for themselves collapsed in certain places. Trenches filled with water.

It's useless to try to describe the sufferings of the men, without shelter, soaked, pierced with cold, badly fed—no pen could tell their tale. You had to have lived through these hours, these days, these nights, to know how interminable they were in times like these.

Proceeding in nightly work details or to and from the front lines, men slipped and fell into shell holes filled with water and weren't able to climb out; they drowned or froze to death, their hands grasping at the edges of the craters in a final effort to pull themselves out."
((3), more)

Thursday, November 30, 1916

"On the last afternoon of November, 1916, the massive portal of Vienna's Gothic Cathedral of St. Stephen swung wide so that the corpse of venerable Emperor-King Francis Joseph might pass through on the way to its final resting place in the nearby Church of the Capuchins—in the crowded crypt of the most eminent Austrian Hapsburgs. Emerging from the Cathedral, three close relatives of the deceased ruler took their designated places behind the casket, the new monarch Charles on one side, in the uniform of a Field Marshal, his consort Zita, clothed in the conventional black on the other, and between them the four-year-old Crown Prince Otto, who presumably would one day reign over the strangest and most picturesque realm on the face of Europe." ((4), more)

Friday, December 1, 1916

"Admiral du Fournier made formal demand for the delivery of the first installment of war material; the reply was a definite refusal. Whereupon, Allied troops and marines were landed from the ships into the harbor.

As the troops marched into Athens they were fired upon by a mob of Greeks, 47 allies being killed. Returning the fire, the Allies killed 29 Greeks. On the following day, the landing party returned to the ships, while the Greek soldiers began intrenching on the heights overlooking Athens. During the melee, the Allied warships fired 38 shells into the city, some of which seemed aimed at the Royal Palace."
((5), more)


Quotation contexts and source information

Monday, November 27, 1916

(1) Account by British Second Lieutenant Ian V. Pyott of his destruction of Zeppelin LZ 34 late on the night of November 27, 1916. Eight Zeppelins set out to bomb industrial targets in the British Midlands on the 27th, a stormy night in which the airships were visible in the glare from the cities and the aurora borealis. One of the eight never made the crossing of the North Sea. Max Dietrich, commanding LZ 34, was flying at 9,800 feet and in the beam of a searchlight when Pyott sighted him. Dietrich and his crew were all killed, Dietrich on his 46th birthday. Early the morning of the 28th, a second Zeppelin, LZ 21 was shot down by airplanes 10 miles east of Lowestoft and fell into the sea with no survivors.

The Zeppelin Fighters by Arch Whitehouse, page 159, copyright © 1966 by Arch Whitehouse, publisher: New English Library, publication date: 1978

Tuesday, November 28, 1916

(2) Eight Zeppelins set out to bomb industrial targets in the British Midlands on November 27, 1916, a stormy night in which the airships were visible in the glare from the cities and the aurora borealis. One of the eight turned back before crossing the North Sea. LZ 34 was picked up by searchlights and shot down by British pilot Ian Pyott shortly before midnight. A second Zeppelin, LZ 21, was shot down by airplanes 10 miles east of Lowestoft and fell into the sea with no survivors early on the 28th. The loss of the two Zeppelins followed those of loss of two others in September and one in October and marked the beginning of the end of the Zeppelin raids on England. The bombing by the L.V.G. presaged the air raids of 1917 and 1918.

The First World War, a Complete History by Martin Gilbert, page 302, copyright © 1994 by Martin Gilbert, publisher: Henry Holt and Company, publication date: 1994

Wednesday, November 29, 1916

(3) Excerpt from the notebooks of French Infantry Corporal Louis Barthas, writing of grim conditions he and his men faced in the Somme sector at the end of November, 1916.

Poilu: The World War I Notebooks of Corporal Louis Barthas, Barrelmaker, 1914-1918 by Louis Barthas, page 282, copyright © 2014 by Yale University, publisher: Yale University Press, publication date: 2014

Thursday, November 30, 1916

(4) Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria-Hungary died on November 21, 1916, and was buried November 30. His crowns and titles — Emperor of Austria and Apostolic King of Hungary — passed to Karl, son of the late brother of the assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

The Passing of the Hapsburg Monarchy, 1914-1918 2 Volumes by Arthur James May, page 422, copyright © 1966 by the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press, publication date: 1966

Friday, December 1, 1916

(5) The Allied troops had gone to Athens, Greece on December 1, 1916 to seize arms, munitions, and artillery from the Greek Government claiming they might otherwise end up in the hands of German and Bulgarian forces. The pro-German King Constantine of Greece had been educated in Germany, and was married to a sister of Kaiser Wilhelm II. Eleftherios Venizelos had been Prime Minister of Greece, but resigned in March, 1915 over the King's refusal to support the Allied invasion of Gallipoli. Re-elected that August, he again parted ways with the King over supporting Serbia against Bulgaria which seemed to be preparing for war. Constantine dismissed his Prime Minister when the Allies landed 13,000 troops at the Greek port of Salonica on October 5, 1915, troops Venizelos had invited to support Serbia's defense. During 1916, the Allies expanded their forces in Greece with the addition of Serbian, Russian, and Italian troops. That October, Venizelos arrived in Salonica to head a new Revolutionary Government, one that had been recognized by the Allies.

King's Complete History of the World War by W.C. King, page 224, copyright © 1922, by W.C. King, publisher: The History Associates, publication date: 1922


1 2 Next