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A crazed Great Britain urges a broken Russia, a nose-picking, dozing Italy, and a sullen France to continued offensives in a German postcard imagining the November 6, 1917 Entente Ally Conference of Rapallo after the Twelfth Battle of the Isonzo. The Battle, also known as the Battle of Caporetto, was a disastrous defeat for Italy and the first Austro-Hungarian offensive on the Isonzo Front. The Austrians had significant German support.
Text:
Entente Konferenz der XII. Isonzoschlacht
Entente Conference of the Twelfth Battle of the Isonzo

A crazed Great Britain urges a broken Russia, a nose-picking, dozing Italy, and a sullen France to continued offensives in a German postcard imagining the November 6, 1917 Entente Ally Conference of Rapallo after the Twelfth Battle of the Isonzo. The Battle, also known as the Battle of Caporetto, was a disastrous defeat for Italy and the first Austro-Hungarian offensive on the Isonzo Front. The Austrians had significant German support.

Chosen Boy, a 1918 watercolor by Paul Klee. From 'Paul Klee: Early and Late Years: 1894-1940'.

Chosen Boy, a 1918 watercolor by Paul Klee. From Paul Klee: Early and Late Years: 1894-1940. © 2013 Moeller Fine Art

Sleepless Nights, by Kriwub. France standing by her bed, arm raised against a giant German soldier watching her through the window. A Zeppelin passes in the distance. Someone has written the years of sleepless nights in blue: 19-14-15-16-17 and perhaps -18.
Text:
Schlaflose Nächte
Sleepless Nights
Reverse:
Verlag Novitas, G.m.b.H. Berlin SW 68
Logo: BO [DO?] in a six-pointed star; No. 245

Sleepless Nights, by Kriwub. France standing by her bed, arm raised against a giant German soldier watching her through the window. A Zeppelin passes in the distance. Someone has written the years of sleepless nights in blue: 19-14-15-16-17 and perhaps -18.

Photograph of two German soldiers in spiked helmets and fur coats, standing in snow woods, holding their rifles with bare hands, dated January 24, 1918. A short translation from the reverse: “. . . The Russians are already gone. They are right. We should do the same . . . " (translation, Thomas Faust).

Photograph of two German soldiers in spiked helmets and fur coats, standing in the snow, dated January 24, 1918. A short translation from the reverse: “. . . The Russians are already gone. They are right. We should do the same . . . " (translation, Thomas Faust). © John Shea

Nautical chart of the Kiel Fjord on the Baltic Sea, leading to Kiel, one of the home ports of the German Baltic Fleet. Just north of Kiel is the entrance to the Kaiser Wilhelm Canal, which crosses the Jutland Peninsula in the state of Schleswig-Holstein, and carries traffic to the mouth of the River Elbe on the North Sea.
Text:
Seekarte der Kieler Föhrde (nautical chart of the Kiel Fjord, Holstein, Kiel itself, and the towns of Laboe and Friedrichsort (and its lighthouse) at the mouth of the fjord.
Someone has annotated the town of Lutterbek.
Reverse:
Field postmarked Laboe, July 5, 1915, 2. Kompagnie I. Seewehr-Abteilung (Company 2, Coast Guard Department???
Verlag v. Franz Heinrich, Laboe-Kiel. Nachdruck verboten 1911. Mit Genehmigung der nautischen Abteilung des Reichs-Marine-Amtes, Berlin (Published by Franz Heinrich, Laboe, Kiel. Reproduction prohibited 1911. With the approval of the Nautical Department of the Reich Naval Office in Berlin)

Nautical chart of the Kiel Fjord on the Baltic Sea, leading to Kiel, one of the home ports of the German Baltic Fleet. Just north of Kiel is the entrance to the Kaiser Wilhelm Canal, which crosses the Jutland Peninsula in the state of Schleswig-Holstein, and carries traffic to the mouth of the River Elbe on the North Sea.

Quotations found: 8

Tuesday, January 22, 1918

"While we stand under the menace—and perhaps on the eve—of the most powerful effort which the enemy has so far attempted against us, there exists no general plan for the operations of the Coalition in 1918." ((1), more)

Wednesday, January 23, 1918

"I know that I shall meet my fate

Somewhere among the clouds above;

Those that I fight I do not hate,

Those that I guard I do not love;

My country is Kiltartan Cross,

My countrymen Kiltartan's poor;

No likely end could bring them loss

Or leave them happier than before.

Nor law, nor duty bade me fight,

Nor public men, nor cheering crowds,

A lonely impulse of delight

Drove to this tumult in the clouds;

I balanced all, brought all to mind,

The years to come seemed waste of breath,

A waste of breath the years behind

In balance with this life, this death."
((2), more)

Wednesday, January 23, 1918

"— the 23rd. Still waiting for the great offensive. 'They give us the programme and the date as if it were a special performance at the Opéra,' writes Anatole France from Antibes. We are also expecting an air raid on Paris. The newspapers themselves are reviving this fear by the renewed warnings. . . .

— the 23rd. An announcement has been made of the restriction of the bread ration to ten ounces. All preceding orders have been cancelled. There is fear of an outbreak of discontent among the working classes. Workmen and farm-hands consume two pounds of bread a day. Cakes have also been abolished, but the tea-rooms substitute cream buns and croquettes, which use up other equally scarce materials, such as butter, milk, and sugar."
((3), more)

Thursday, January 24, 1918

"The Russians are already gone. They are right. We should do the same." ((4), more)

Friday, January 25, 1918

"On 25 January [1918] the workers of the Torpedo Yard in Kiel walked off their jobs to protest the Navy's decision to send several of their 'foremen' to the front as punishment for public demonstrations for food. Within 72 hours, the number of strikers had reached 24 000. By 28 January they were joined by tens of thousands of workers in Berlin; 2 days later the police estimated the number at 185 000 from 299 factories. Daily food consumption had fallen from 3000 calories in peacetime to just 1400 by 1918." ((5), more)


Quotation contexts and source information

Tuesday, January 22, 1918

(1) General Maxime Weygand, the French military representative to the Allied Supreme War Council, writing to French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau on January 22, 1918. The Allies had created the Council at the Rapallo conference in November, 1917, giving it responsibility to oversee the general conduct of the war and make recommendations to the Allied governments. Since the Bolshevik Revolution that same month and the armistice and subsequent peace negotiations between Russia and the Central Powers at Brest-Litovsk, the Allies had been anticipating a German offensive in the west bolstered by forces moved from the Eastern Front.

The Memoirs of Marshal Foch, translated by Col. T. Bentley Mott by Ferdinand Foch, pp. 238–239, copyright © 1931 by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., publisher: Doubleday, Doran & Co., publication date: 1931

Wednesday, January 23, 1918

(2) 'An Irish Airman Foresees his Death' by William Butler Yeats. Major Robert Gregory, the son of Lady Gregory, died January 23, 1918.

The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats by William Butler Yeats, page 135, copyright © 1983, 1989 by Anne Yeats, publisher: Collier Books MacMillan Publishing Company

Wednesday, January 23, 1918

(3) Entries for January 23, 1918, from the diary of Michel Corday, a senior civil servant in the French government writing in Paris. Corday wrote frequently about the luxury available in the French capital that was denied the less fortunate and the soldiers at the front. Since the Bolshevik Revolution in November, 1917, and the armistice and subsequent peace negotiations between Russia and the Central Powers at Brest-Litovsk, the Allies had been anticipating a German offensive in the west bolstered by forces moved from the Eastern Front. Anatole France was a French poet, novelist, and journalist, and a friend of Corday who appears numerous times in Corday's diary. Antibes is on the French Mediterranean coast.

The Paris Front: an Unpublished Diary: 1914-1918 by Michel Corday, pp. 309–310, copyright © 1934, by E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc., publisher: E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc., publication date: 1934

Thursday, January 24, 1918

(4) Part of the message on the back of a photograph of two German soldiers in spiked helmets and fur coats, standing in snowy woods, holding their rifles with bare hands, dated January 24, 1918. After Russia's February 1917 Revolution, which abolished the death penalty in the army, loosened the Army's command structure, and promised the transfer of land to the peasants, many soldiers simply left the front. This intensified after the failed Kerensky Offensive in July and the subsequent suspension of all Russian offensive actions. The Bolshevik Revolution in November promised an end to the war, and an armistice and peace negotiations between Russia and the Central Powers followed swiftly. In January, 1918, however, the negotiations at Brest-Litovsk were at a stalemate. Translation by Thomas Faust, ebay's Urfaust.

We should go too, publisher: Unknown, publication date: 1918-01-24

Friday, January 25, 1918

(5) Workers in Austria-Hungary and then Germany went on strike in January, 1918 as hunger and war-weariness bit. Hopes for an end to the war that arose from the December, 1917 armistice between Russia and the Central Powers were dashed on January 12 when German military representative General Max Hoffman made it clear Germany would not evacuate occupied territory on the Eastern Front. Anticipating revolutionary activity across war-weary Europe, Russian representative Leon Trotsky played for time. Kiel, the German Empire's major port on the Baltic Sea, was connected to the North Sea by the Kaiser Wilhelm Canal.

The First World War: Germany and Austria Hungary 1914-1918 by Holger H. Herwig, pp. 378–379, copyright © 1997 Holger H. Herwig, publisher: Arnold, publication date: 1997


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