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German volunteer motorboat in a reconnaissance skirmish. After a painting by C. W. Kiesslich.
Text, reverse:
Kriegskünstlerkarten nach Originalen des Schlachtenmalers C. W. Kiesslich: Deutsches Freiwilligen-Motorboot im Aufklärungsgefecht
Artist battle cards after originals of the battle painter C. W. Kiesslich: German volunteer motorboat in a reconnaissance skirmish

German volunteer motorboat in a reconnaissance skirmish. After a painting by C. W. Kiesslich.

Image text

Text, reverse:

Kriegskünstlerkarten nach Originalen des Schlachtenmalers C. W. Kiesslich: Deutsches Freiwilligen-Motorboot im Aufklärungsgefecht



Artist battle cards after originals of the battle painter C. W. Kiesslich: German volunteer motorboat in a reconnaissance skirmish

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Sunday, August 13, 1916

"On 29 July [1916] the Germans, Austrians, and Bulgarians reached an agreement, later adhered to by the Turks, on the conduct of the campaign. Field Marshal Mackensen was given command of the southern frontier, that is, the region of the Dobrudja and Danube. AOK decided to retain the majority of the Danube Flotilla in the lower Danube rather than ordering it to make the long trip upstream from Rustschuk. After hostilities began, the flotilla, including the monitors at Rustschuk and the armed steamers spread along the Danube, proceeded to Balene; only the armed steamer Almos and patrol boats Lachs and Stör were upstream at Kladovo, and there were a few German motorboats at Orsova. The Austrians also sent special bridging equipment down to Belene in a few echelons in preparation for a future crossing of the Danube. On 13 August the Danube Flotilla was placed under the orders of Army Group Mackensen."

Quotation Context

As Romania negotiated its entry into the war, its soon-to-be adversaries prepared. Protected by mountains to the north, only the barrier of the Danube River stood between it and Bulgaria to the south. In the country's east, where the Danube turned north before flowing east into the Black Sea, was the Dobruja, a region with no natural barrier against an offensive from the south. August von Mackensen was one of Germany's most effective generals during the war.

Source

A Naval History of World War I by Paul G. Halpern, page 275, copyright © 1994 by the United States Naval Institute, publisher: UCL Press, publication date: 1994

Tags

1916-08-13, 1916, August, Danube, Mackensen, von Mackensen, motorboat, river, riverboat