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Map of the the Balkan Front — Germany's Southeast Front — with the mountain passes between Austria-Hungary and Romania. From the Reichsarchiv history of the wars in Serbia and Romania, Herbstschlacht in Macedonien; Cernabogen 1916.
The capitals of Belgrade (Serbia), Bucharest (Romania), Sofia (Bulgaria), and Constantinople (Turkey) are prominent, as is Salonica, Greece, the Allied entry port into the country.
Text:
Übersichtskarte der Süd-Ost-Front
Skizze I.
Erklärungen:
Oesterreich Ungarn
Landesgrenzen
Overview map of the south-east front 
Sketch I. 
Explanations: 
Austria-Hungary
Borders

Map of the the Balkan Front — Germany's Southeast Front — with the mountain passes between Austria-Hungary and Romania. From the Reichsarchiv history of the wars in Serbia and Romania, Herbstschlacht in Macedonien; Cernabogen 1916.
The capitals of Belgrade (Serbia), Bucharest (Romania), Sofia (Bulgaria), and Constantinople (Turkey) are prominent, as is Salonica, Greece, the Allied entry port into the country.

Image text

Übersichtskarte der Süd-Ost-Front

Skizze I.

Erklärungen:

Oesterreich Ungarn

Landesgrenzen



Overview map of the south-east front

Sketch I.

Explanations:

Austria-Hungary

Borders

Other views: Larger, Larger

Sunday, September 15, 1918

"On September 15, agreeably with the general forward movement of the Allies on all the fronts, the so-called Salonika Army developed an offensive against Bulgaria, having for its central objective the important town and railway junction of Uskub. It was indeed a heterogeneous army that advanced under the orders of Franchet d'Esperey, the ultimate successor of Sarrail. Eight French, seven British, six Greek (Venizelist), six Serbian, and four Italian Divisions—all under strength, wasted with fever, and modestly equipped with artillery, set themselves in motion against the mountainous frontiers of Bulgaria. Seventeen Bulgarian and two Turkish divisions, gripped and guided by a few German battalions and batteries and the prestige of Mackensen, constituted a force ample for a successful defence of such difficult country. But the Bulgarians would fight no more."

Quotation Context

Summary from Winston Churchill's history of the war on the Allied Balkan offensive that French General Franchet d'Esperey opened on September 15, 1918. General Maurice Sarrail had originally led Allied forces in the region, forces that had been invited by Greek Prime Minister Eleftherios Venizelos but opposed by Greek King Constantine. With French and British firepower backing him, Venizelos won and the King was deposed. German Field Marshal August Mackensen had been victorious on the Russian Front and in the conquests of Serbia and Romania. Bulgaria was war weary. By September, 1918 German forces on the Western Front had been driven back from all the territory taken in their spring and summer offensives.

Source

The World Crisis 1911-1918 by Winston Churchill, page 834, copyright © by Charles Scribner's Sons 1931, renewed by Winston S. Churchill 1959, publisher: Penguin Books, publication date: 1931, 2007

Tags

1918-09-15, 1918, September, Franchet d'Esperey. Sarrail, Venizelos, Mackensen, Bulgaria, Balkan Front