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Peoples of Austria-Hungary in 1914 from 'Historical Atlas' by William R. Shepherd. The empire's population included Germans, Magyars, Romanians, Italians, and Slavs including Croats, Serbians, Ruthenians, Czechs, Slovaks, Poles, and Slovenes.

Peoples of Austria-Hungary in 1914 from Historical Atlas by William R. Shepherd. The empire's population included Germans, Magyars, Romanians, Italians, and Slavs including Croats, Serbians, Ruthenians, Czechs, Slovaks, Poles, and Slovenes.

Image text

Peoples of Austria-Hungary in 1914

Legend:

Germans, Magyars, Romanians, Italians, and Slavs including Croats, Serbians, Ruthenians, Czechs, Slovaks, Poles, and Slovenes.

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Wednesday, May 1, 1918

"On May 1, 1918, an estimated throng of 70,000 parading in Prague set up chants to 'Hang the Kaiser,' demanded more food, independence, and peace, and a fortnight later, Czech patriots converted the fiftieth anniversary of the establishment of the Bohemian National Theater into a gala patriotic demonstration. Representatives of other Hapsburg national communities attended the Prague celebration, which took on the quality of a version of the Congress of Oppressed Nationalities recently held in Rome; spokesmen of Slav nationalities impressively demonstrated their solidarity with the Czechs."

Quotation Context

The fault lines in the Austro-Hungarian Empire deepened and widened at the war progressed, as casualties mounted, as shortages of food and fuel bit. Hungarians asked why they were being sent across the Empire to fight on the Italian Front, and refused shipments of food to Austria. Czech prisoners of war held in Russia formed a Czech Legion fighting alongside Imperial Russian troops against Austria-Hungary. After the Bolshevik Revolution and peace between Russia and the Central Powers, these Legionnaires would make their way eastward to the Pacific port of Vladivostok in the next stage of a journey to circle the globe to return them home to fight for an independent Czech state.

Source

The Passing of the Hapsburg Monarchy, 1914-1918 2 Volumes by Arthur James May, Vol. 2, p. 676, copyright © 1966 by the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press, publication date: 1966

Tags

1918-05-01, 1918, May, Prague, Czech, Czechs, May Day, Peoples of Austria-Hungary