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The Aegean Sea

Map showing the territorial gains (darker shades) of Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia, Montenegro, and Greece, primarily at the expense of Turkey, agreed in the Treaty of Bucharest following the Second Balkan War. Despite its gains, Bulgaria also lost territory to both Romania and Turkey.
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The Balkan States According to the Treaty of Bucharest; Acquisitions of New Territory shown by darker shades

Map showing the territorial gains (darker shades) of Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia, Montenegro, and Greece, primarily at the expense of Turkey, agreed in the Treaty of Bucharest following the Second Balkan War. Despite its gains, Bulgaria also lost territory to both Romania and Turkey.

Image text

The Balkan States According to the Treaty of Bucharest; Acquisitions of New Territory shown by darker shades

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The Aegean Sea is part of the eastern Mediterranean Sea, bordered by Greece, Turkey, and the island of Crete. The Dardanelles Strait lies in the northeast Aegean. The many islands in the Aegean were Greece or Turkish, but in treaty negotiations after the Second Balkan war, Turkey lost all its Aegean islands but Imbros (Gökçeada) and Tenedos (Bozcaada). The two islands lay at the entrance to the Dardanelles, with Imbros to the northwest and Tenedos southwest.

When Turkey entered the war in 1914, Britain seized Imbros and Tenedos, building air fields on each island, and using them as naval and supply bases for the Dardanelles and Gallipoli campaigns.

In an attempt to support Serbia, and with an ongoing debate about whether to evacuate Gallipoli, France and Britain landed 13,000 troops at the Greek port of Salonika on October 5, 1915. By the end of the war, the Allies would have an army of over 600,000 men on the Salonica Front.

On January 20, 1918, Turkey's two most powerful warships, Yavuz Sultan Selim and Midilli (the former German battleships Goeben and Breslau) ventured from the Dardanelles to attack Royal Navy ships at Imbros and the Greek island of Mudros. Successful at Imbros, the two ships crossed a minefield which sunk Midilli and heavily damaged Yavuz Sultan Selim, which made it back to the Dardanelles where it suffered further damage from bombing raids.

The Aegean Sea is a sea in Mediterranean Sea.