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Nisch

Germany and King Ferdinand of Bulgaria squeeze pincers on Serbia at the city of Nisch. Germany and Austria-Hungary began their joint invasion across Serbia's norther border on October 6, 1915. Bulgaria entered the war on the side of the Central Powers on October 14, and invaded Serbia from the east. Nisch fell to the invaders on November 5.
The Serbia capital of Belgrade on the Danube and the city of Monastir on the Greek border are marked with initials.
Handmade postcard map dated November 12, 1915.
Text:
Serbien Kopot, Kapot, Kaput (?)
Peter bankraft, bankratt (?)
Marked are the Adriatic and Aegean Seas, Greece, Albania, Montenegro, Bulgaria, neutral Rumania, Hungary.
Deliblat. (?)
Reverse:
Unsern tapferen Truppen im Felde gewidmet von der Tintenfabrik Eduard Beyer, Chemnitz i/s - Teplitz i/s.
Dedicated to our courageous forces in the field from the ink factory Edward Beyer, Chemnitz i/s - Teplitz i/s

Germany and King Ferdinand of Bulgaria squeeze pincers on Serbia at the city of Nisch. Germany and Austria-Hungary began their joint invasion across Serbia's norther border on October 6, 1915. Bulgaria entered the war on the side of the Central Powers on October 14, and invaded Serbia from the east. Nisch fell to the invaders on November 5.
The Serbia capital of Belgrade on the Danube and the city of Monastir on the Greek border are marked with initials.
Handmade postcard map dated November 12, 1915.

Image text

Serbien Kopot, Kapot, Kaput (?)

[Serbian King] Peter bankraft, bankratt (?)

Marked are the Adriatic and Aegean Seas, Greece, Albania, Montenegro, Bulgaria, Rumania, Hungary.

Deliblat (?)



Reverse:

Unsern tapferen Truppen im Felde gewidmet von der Tintenfabrik Eduard Beyer, Chemnitz i/s - Teplitz i/s.

Dedicated to our courageous forces in the field from the ink factory Edward Beyer, Chemnitz i/s - Teplitz i/s

Other views: Larger, Back

Threatened by Austria-Hungary's invasion of Serbia, the government fled Belgrade for the relative safety of Niš (Nisch).

On December 7, 1914, Serbian Prime Minister Nikola Pašić addressed the Serbian National Assembly, stating that the government 'considers its most important and, at this fateful time, its sole task as being to secure a successful end to that great war which, at the moment of its inception, also became a struggle for the liberation and unification of all our brother Serbs, Croats and Slovenes who are not free.' Pašić's brief statement became known as the Niš Declaration, and was reported to representatives of its allies France, Russia, and Great Britain.

Niš was captured by Bulgarian forces on November 5, 1915 in the conquest of Serbia by combined Central Power forces.

Nisch is a city in Serbia.