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Zimmermann Telegram

A hold-to-light postcard of the German and Austro-Hungarian victory (shortlived) over the Russians in the Uzroker Pass in the Carpathians on January 28, 1915. %+%Person%m%32%n%Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf%-%, Chief of the Austro-Hungarian General Staff, launched an offensive with three armies on Janaury 23 including the new Austro-Hungarian Seventh Army under General %+%Person%m%27%n%Karl von Pflanzer-Baltin%-%.
Text:
Karpathen
Siegreiche Kämpfe am Uzroker-Paß
28. Januar 1915 
The Carpathians
Victorious fighting at the Uzroker Pass
January 28, 1915
Reverse:
Message dated and field postmarked September 7, 1916, 29th Infantry Division.

A hold-to-light postcard of the German and Austro-Hungarian victory (shortlived) over the Russians in the Uzroker Pass in the Carpathians on January 28, 1915. Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf, Chief of the Austro-Hungarian General Staff, launched an offensive with three armies on Janaury 23, including the new Austro-Hungarian Seventh Army under General Karl von Pflanzer-Baltin.

Image text

Karpathen

Siegreiche Kämpfe am Uzroker-Paß

28. Januar 1915



The Carpathians

Victorious fighting at the Uzroker Pass

January 28, 1915



Reverse:

Message dated and field postmarked September 7, 1916, 29th Infantry Division.

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The Zimmermann Telegram to sent on January 19, 1917 from German Secretary of Foreign Affairs Alfred Zimmerman to Germany's Mexican Minister, von Eckhardt.

When war began in 1914, Great Britain had cut Germany's transatlantic cables. Germany's communications with its diplomats around the world, including those in America, travelled over British cables. The Germans were confident in their encryption. The British, who monitored cable traffic, had German code books. On January 19, the German Secretary of Foreign Affairs Alfred Zimmerman sent what would become known as the Zimmerman Telegram to Germany's ambassador in Mexico. Intercepted by both the British and Americans, the telegram announced the new submarine war, hoped America would remain neutral, but offered Mexico an alliance in the case of war. Should war occur, Mexico was to 'reconquer the lost territory in New Mexico, Texas and Arizona.' Mexico was further to act as an intermediary between Germany and Japan. On February 28, the note was made public.

1917-01-19