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'December snow.' Hand-painted watercolor calendar for December 1917 by Schima Martos. Particulates from a smoking kerosene lamp overspread the days of December, and are labeled 'December höra,' 'December snow.' The first five days or nights of the month show a couple at, sitting down to, or rising from a lamp-lit table. The rest of the month the nights are dark, other than four in which the quarter of the moon shows through a window, or Christmas, when the couple stands in the light of a Christmas tree.

'December snow.' Hand-painted watercolor calendar for December 1917 by Schima Martos. Particulates from a smoking kerosene lamp overspread the days of December, and are labeled 'December höra,' 'December snow.' The first five days or nights of the month show a couple at, sitting down to, or rising from a lamp-lit table. The rest of the month the nights are dark, other than four in which the quarter of the moon shows through a window, or Christmas, when the couple stands in the light of a Christmas tree.

Image text

December höra

December snow

2½ liter petroleum.

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Saturday, September 23, 1916

"The food distribution is fairer [in Bavaria than in Prussia]. Wild birds are to be had without meat cards, but not chickens or ducks. For all supplies, visitors must have cards. The hotels furnish only bread and meat tickets. I refused to go through the red tape needed to secure magistrate's cards for other edibles. The result made meals frugal. Eagerly I would scan a bill of fare. My eye would light on a pudding. Putting is a luxury. 'I'll have some,' I'd order. 'I'm sorry, Madame,' the waiter would reply, 'but the pudding contains an egg and you have no egg card.' In despair I would turn to something else. 'Give me this,' I would urge. But again would come the answer, 'I'm sorry, Madame, but that contains meal and you have no meal card.' Food is richer in Munich than in Berlin, for fodder is better and the animals fatter. But I had less to eat than in Prussia."

Quotation Context

American Madeleine Doty writing of her visit to Munich in Bavaria in September, 1916. She continues, 'In spite of Bavaria's attempt to democratize food, her poor go hungry. As in Berlin, there are long lines of people struggling for potatoes. The wages of unskilled workers have not perceptibly increase. The poor can't afford the city's feeding kitchens. Munich is one of Germany's richest cities but it has extreme poverty.' Doty begins her chapter on 'Peace Meetings in Munich' relating how, 'Official Germany tries to Prussianize her people through education.' Of a teacher friend she writes, 'German for generations, she comes of Jewish stock' and taught history. Learning of this the central school authorities sent the school principal the following order: 'Do not let that young woman teach history. Only a Prussian may teach German history. Let her teach mathematics.' The same spirit walks among us in 2016.

Source

Short Rations: an American Woman in Germany 1915-1916 by Madeleine Z. Doty, pp. 208–209, copyright © 1917, by The Century Co., publisher: A. L. Burt Company, publication date: 1917

Tags

1916-09-23, 1916, September, ration, rationing, ration card, food shortage, food