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Map of the Gallipoli Peninsula from Suvla Bay to Anzac Cove  from 'Gallipoli' by John Masefield. In landing at Suvla Bay on August 6, 1915, the Allies hoped to open a new sector on Gallipoli that, with a simultaneous advance from Anzac Cove, would break the stalemate that had held since the April 25 invasion. The plan failed. Locations shown include Suvla Bay, the Salt Lake, dry in summer, Ari Burnu or Anzac Cove, named for the Australia and New Zealand Army Corps that held it, Chunuk Bair, where the New Zealanders suffered devastating casualties, and Battleship Hill, deadly to the Australians.

Map of the Gallipoli Peninsula from Suvla Bay to Anzac Cove from 'Gallipoli' by John Masefield. In landing at Suvla Bay on August 6, 1915, the Allies hoped to open a new sector on Gallipoli that, with a simultaneous advance from Anzac Cove, would break the stalemate that had held since the April 25 invasion. The plan failed. Locations shown include Suvla Bay, the Salt Lake, dry in summer, Ari Burnu or Anzac Cove, named for the Australia and New Zealand Army Corps that held it, Chunuk Bair, where the New Zealanders suffered devastating casualties, and Battleship Hill, deadly to the Australians.

Image text

Suvla Bay

Salt Lake

Ari Burnu or Anzac Cove

Chunuk Bair

Battleship Hill

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Friday, August 6, 1915

"The Corps Commander turned to me and said, Where will the enemy come from?' Pointing with my hand in the direction of Ari Burnu, and along the whole shore as far as Suvla, I said, 'From here.'

'Very well, supposing he does come from there, how will he advance?' Again pointing towards Ari Burnu, I moved my hand in a semi-circle towards Koja Chemen Tepe. 'He will advance from here,' I said. The Corps Commander smiled and patted my shoulder. 'Don't you worry, he can't do it,' he said. Seeing that it was impossible to convince him I felt it unnecessary to prolong the argument any further. I confined myself to saying, 'God willing, sir, things will turn out as you expect.'"

Quotation Context

Excerpt from the account by Mustafa Kemal, later Ataturk, of his experiences in the Gallipoli campaign, as retold by Alan Moorehead in his classic Gallipoli. Kemal reported this exchange took place two months before the Allied attack that began the night of August 6, 1915, at Ari Burnu, at the northern end of Anzac Cove, where Australian, New Zealand, and Turkish troops had battled under horrendous conditions since the invasion of April 25, and Hill 971, which the invaders hoped to reach from Suvla Bay, several miles north of Anzac, where a thin Turkish defense awaited the most recent invasion.

Source

Gallipoli by Alan Moorehead, page 251, copyright © 1956 by Alan Moorehead, publisher: Perennial Classics 2002 (HarperCollins Publications 1956), publication date: 2002 (1956)

Tags

1915-08-06, 1915, August, Suvla, Suvla Bay