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In July 1915, British and German forces fought three engagements in Hooge, a village near Ypres with a destroyed chateau held by the Germans, and its stables held by the British. A British mine on July 19 opened a crater 120 feet across. On July 30, the Germans attacked with flamethrowers, the first time the British had faced the weapon. Map from Military Operations France and Belgium, 1915, Vol. II, by Brigadier-General J.E. Edmonds and Captain G.C. Wynne. Map by Major A.F. Becke R.A. (Retired) Hon. M.A. (Oxon.)
Text:
Sketch 14
Hooge, 30th and 31st July 1915.
The Liquid-Fire Attack

Legend:
German Front Line before the Attack
German Front Line at the close of the Action
British trenches, captured or evacuated
British Front Line at the close of the Action
British trenches
Unoccupied crater

In July 1915, British and German forces fought three engagements in Hooge, a village near Ypres with a destroyed chateau held by the Germans, and its stables held by the British. A British mine on July 19 opened a crater 120 feet across. On July 30, the Germans attacked with flamethrowers, the first time the British had faced the weapon. Map from Military Operations France and Belgium, 1915, Vol. II, by Brigadier-General J.E. Edmonds and Captain G.C. Wynne. Map by Major A.F. Becke R.A. (Retired) Hon. M.A. (Oxon.)

Image text

Sketch 14

Hooge, 30th and 31st July 1915.

The Liquid-Fire Attack



Legend:

German Front Line before the Attack

German Front Line at the close of the Action

British trenches, captured or evacuated

British Front Line at the close of the Action

British trenches

Unoccupied crater

Other views: Larger

Thursday, July 22, 1915

"Two other attempts to seize important parts of the enemy's line near Hooge were made on the evening of the 22nd July [1915]. The first was directed a little to the east of the salient captured on the 19th, in the 3rd Division area; the other further north near Railway Wood, in the area of the 14th Division. Both were carried out without mining or other element of surprise and both failed, breaking down under heavy fire. In each case, two platoons, supported by bombers and an R.E. detachment, took part."

Quotation Context

In July 1915, British and German forces fought three engagements in Hooge, a village near Ypres, with a destroyed chateau held by the Germans, and its stables held by the British. The British set off a mine that opened a crater 120 feet across to begin an attack on July 19. They gained and held a small amount of ground. Their attack on the 22nd had no mine, no element of surprise, and failed. 'R.E.' is the Royal Engineers, which had dug the mine fired on the 19th, in this case, the 175th Tunnelling Company.

Source

Military Operations France and Belgium, 1915, Vol. II, Battles of Aubers Ridge, Festubert, and Loos by J. E. Edmonds, page 103, copyright © asserted, publisher: Macmillan and Co., Limited, publication date: 1928

Tags

1915-07-22, 1915, July, Hooge