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An Austro-Hungarian soldier posing for the camera, leaning on his rifle, bayonet at his waist. He is from the k.u.k (kaiserlich und königlich/imperial and royal) Landsturm Battalion No. 83, a reserve militia of men 34 to 55, some of whom saw active duty.
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k.u.k (kaiserlich und königlich/imperial and royal) Landsturm Bataillon No. 83
Emil Lorenz, Photograph. Böhm Leipa Herrengasse 243
k.u.k (kaiserlich und königlich/imperial and royal) Landsturm Battalion No. 83

An Austro-Hungarian soldier posing for the camera, leaning on his rifle, bayonet at his waist. He is from the k.u.k (kaiserlich und königlich/imperial and royal) Landsturm Battalion No. 83, a reserve militia of men 34 to 55, some of whom saw active duty.

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k.u.k (kaiserlich und königlich/imperial and royal) Landsturm Bataillon No. 83



k.u.k (kaiserlich und königlich/imperial and royal) Landsturm Battalion No. 83



Emil Lorenz, Photograph. Böhm Leipa Herrengasse 243

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Wednesday, November 25, 1914

"'The situation [of the 9th Division] is appalling,' a general wrote on November 25[, 1914]. 'One encounters a parade of horribles: wounded men covered in blood, stinking carcasses, broken-down wagons, mud-encrusted troops. How much longer can this continue?' Half of the Austro-Hungarian cavalry fought on foot because their horses had perished.

A new category appeared on Austrian casualty lists:
marod, dienstuntauglich (broken, unusable). Soon this category began to outnumber killed, wounded, and missing."

Quotation Context

In Austria-Hungary's third and largest invasion of Serbia in 1914, General Oskar Potiorek was destroying his invading army. It had not been clothed for winter and mountain combat; it was running out of supplies of food and munitions, even as soldiers discarded the latter as they advanced. Some soldiers marched barefoot; others wrote of contemplating suicide, of rain, snow, and the cold.

Source

A Mad Catastrophe by Geoffrey Wawro, pp. 326, 327, copyright © 2014 by Geoffrey Wawro, publisher: Basic Books

Tags

1914-11-25, 1914, November, Invasion of Serbia