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Mobilization

Families and friends see off a train of reservists at a train station.
Text:
Nr. 5. Einzug der Reservisten
Serie 36/1; Phot: Gebr. Haeckel
A train of reservists
Reverse:
Ausgabe des Kriegsfürsorgeamtes Wien IX.
Zum Gloria-Viktoria Album
Sammel. u. Nachschlagewerk des Völkerkrieges
War Office Assistance Edition, Vienna IX
For Gloria Victoria album
Collection and reference book of international war.

Families and friends see off a train of reservists at a train station.

Image text

Nr. 5. Einzug der Reservisten

Serie 36/1; Phot: Gebr. Haeckel



A train of reservists



Reverse:

Ausgabe des Kriegsfürsorgeamtes Wien IX.

Zum Gloria-Viktoria Album

Sammel. u. Nachschlagewerk des Völkerkrieges



War Office Assistance Edition, Vienna IX

For Gloria Victoria album

Collection and reference book of international war.

Other views: Larger

Hugh Gibson, Secretary of the American Legation in Brussels, described Belgian mobilization in 1914. With war threatening on July 28, Belgium called up the reserves, and closed the Bourse. On July 30 he wrote, "Brussels is beginning to look warlike," with troops and Boy Scouts in the streets, and railway stations occupied. The night of July 31, police delivered orders for mobilization, requiring men to leave for their regiments "within the hour." On August 1, the government began to requisition cars. On Sunday August 2, Brussels was under martial law, patrolled by grenadiers and lancers. Gibson wrote, "The money situation is bad," with small change disappearing, people fearing currency was worthless, and police keeping order at banks. Communication was difficult as the military had priority. The Paris newspapers did not arrive. The government seized stores of staples: bread, rice, beans, and began fixing prices. There were, however, happy crowds at the French legation.

On Monday August 3, there was no mail. On August 4, with German forces in Belgium, the military had left for the front, and the Garde Civique patrolled Brussels.

Austria-Hungary

Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia on July 28 though its forces could not be mobilized until August 12. In a telegram to Tsar Nicholas II on July 30, 1914, Kaiser Wilhelm emphasized that Austria-Hungary had mobilized only part of its army, and only against Serbia.

Russia

Russia responded to Austria-Hungary's declaration of war on Serbia on July 28 by partial mobilization. When Austria-Hungary shelled the capital of Belgrade on the 29th, Russia escalated to full mobilization.

Germany

Germany's war plan assumed war with either Russia and France meant war with both. Germany would quickly defeat France while Russia slowly mobilized, then shift forces to the east over Germany's excellent rail system. When Russia fully mobilized, Germany declared war.