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Gas mask

A postcard of a notice explaining the use of gas masks to civilians for both adults and children. It was posted in Reims, France in June and July 1916 by the chief of the Health Service of the French Fifth Army. Reims was heavily damaged in 1914 and changed hands during the war.
Selected Text:
V ͤ  Armée, Service de Santé
Instruction sur l'Application des Masques de Défense contre les Gaz Asphyxiants
1. Masques pour les grandes personnes
Ces masques se composent de deux parties : les lunettes et le "masque" proprement dit.
2. Masques pour les enfants
Ces masques se composent également de deux parties : les lunettes et le bâillon ou tampon.
Recommendation importante. - Les masques et bâillons perdent leurs proprietès à l'humidité. Il est expressément recommandé de les tenir enfermés dans leurs sachets imperméables et STRICTEMENT INTERDIT DE LES MOUILLER.
Le Medecin Inspecteur,
Chef superieur du Service de Santé de la  V ͤ  Armée,
E. Pauzat.
Caption:
Reims dans ses années de bombardements 1914-15-16
Affiche apposée sur les murs de la Ville Juin-Juillet 1916 - Service de Santé - V ͤ  Armée
Collection G. Dubois, Reims - Reproduction interdite

Fifth Army Health Service 
Instruction for the Application of Gas Masks 
1. Masks for adults
These masks are composed of two parts: the glasses and the "mask" itself. 
2. Masks for children
These masks are also made up of two parts: the glasses and the gag or plug.
Important recommendation. - Masks and gags lose their potency to moisture. It is specifically recommended to keep them locked in their waterproof pouches and STRICTLY FORBIDDEN TO WET THEM. 
Inspector Doctor, 
Chief of the Health Service of the Fifth Army 
E. Pauzat. 
caption: 
Reims in her years of bombardment 1914-15-16 
Poster affixed to the walls of the City June-July 1916 - Health Service -  Fifth Army 
Collection G. Dubois, Reims - Reproduction prohibited

A postcard of a notice explaining the use of gas masks to civilians for both adults and children. It was posted in Reims, France in June and July 1916 by the chief of the Health Service of the French Fifth Army. Reims was heavily damaged in 1914 and changed hands during the war.

Image text

Selected Text:

V ͤ Armée, Service de Santé

Instruction sur l'Application des Masques de Défense contre les Gaz Asphyxiants

1. Masques pour les grandes personnes

Ces masques se composent de deux parties : les lunettes et le "masque" proprement dit.

2. Masques pour les enfants

Ces masques se composent également de deux parties : les lunettes et le bâillon ou tampon.

Recommendation importante. - Les masques et bâillons perdent leurs proprietès à l'humidité. Il est expressément recommandé de les tenir enfermés dans leurs sachets imperméables et STRICTEMENT INTERDIT DE LES MOUILLER.

Le Medecin Inspecteur,

Chef superieur du Service de Santé de la V ͤ Armée,

E. Pauzat.

Caption:

Reims dans ses années de bombardements 1914-15-16

Affiche apposée sur les murs de la Ville Juin-Juillet 1916 - Service de Santé - V ͤ Armée

Collection G. Dubois, Reims - Reproduction interdite



Fifth Army Health Service

Instruction for the Application of Gas Masks

1. Masks for adults

These masks are composed of two parts: the glasses and the "mask" itself.

2. Masks for children

These masks are also made up of two parts: the glasses and the gag or plug.

Important recommendation. - Masks and gags lose their potency to moisture. It is specifically recommended to keep them locked in their waterproof pouches and STRICTLY FORBIDDEN TO WET THEM.

Inspector Doctor,

Chief of the Health Service of the Fifth Army

E. Pauzat.

caption:

Reims in her years of bombardment 1914-15-16

Poster affixed to the walls of the City June-July 1916 - Health Service - Fifth Army

Collection G. Dubois, Reims - Reproduction prohibited

Other views: Larger, Larger

Gas masks are a defense against poison gas. The German deserter who warned the Allies on April 13, 1915 of the imminent use of poison gas delivered a gas-mask to support his story. Despite his warning, the Allies were unprepared for the first effective use of poison gas in the Second Battle of Ypres on April 22.

The first gas masks covered the mouth and nose, and were made of cotton wool, sometimes with a chemical solution to counteract the poison gas, and sometimes supported by a metal frame. Adding goggles could protect the eyes.

More sophisticated gas masks covered the entire face or head, and could included filters, attached either directly to the head covering, or connected to it through a hose.

Gas mask is a chemical weapons and defenses.