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%i1%La Domenica del Corriere%i0% of August 22–29, 1915, an illustrated weekly supplement to Corriere della Sera, published in Milan, Italy. The front and back covers are full-page illustrations by the great Italian illustrator Achille Beltrame. This back cover is an illustration of Italian author, pilot, soldier, and self-promoter Gabriele d'Annunzio dropping streamers in the colors of the Italian flag and bearing patriotic massages over Trieste, Austria-Hungary, a city with a large ethnic Italian population.
Text:
Il volo di d'Annunzio su Trieste. Il Poeta lancia patriottici messaggi ai nostri fratelli: 'La fine del vostro martirio è prossima!'
The flight of d'Annunzio over Trieste. The Poet launches patriotic messages to our brothers: 'The end of your martyrdom is near!'

La Domenica del Corriere of August 22–29, 1915, an illustrated weekly supplement to Corriere della Sera, published in Milan, Italy. The front and back covers are full-page illustrations by the great Italian illustrator Achille Beltrame. This back cover is an illustration of Italian author, pilot, soldier, and self-promoter Gabriele d'Annunzio dropping streamers in the colors of the Italian flag and bearing patriotic massages over Trieste, Austria-Hungary, a city with a large ethnic Italian population.

Image text

Il volo di d'Annunzio su Trieste. Il Poeta lancia patriottici messaggi ai nostri fratelli: 'La fine del vostro martirio è prossima!'



The flight of d'Annunzio over Trieste. The Poet launches patriotic messages to our brothers: 'The end of your martyrdom is near!'



(Disegno de A. Beltrame).

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Friday, December 3, 1915

"Never as in the deathly silence, when the trench is sleeping and 10 metres beyond lies an ambush of darkness and foliage, does one feel the presence of war. War is not in the explosion of grenades or a fusillade nor in hand-to-hand combat. War is not in what, from far off, one believes to be its terrible reality and which, close at hand, turns out to be a poor thing and makes little impression; it is — as Tolstoy realized — to be found in that curious space beyond one's trench, where there is silence and calm and where the corn is ripening to no purpose. It is that sense of certain death which lies 'beyond', there where the sun still shines on the age-old roads and the peasants' houses."

Quotation Context

Excerpt by Scipio Slataper, an Austro-Hungarian writer from Trieste and Italian nationalist. His mother was Italian, his father Slavic. He and his wife were living in Hamburg, Germany when war broke out in 1914. They returned to Italy where, by the end of the year, Slataper was writing in favor of Italy's entry into the war. After Italy declared war on Austria-Hungary he joined the Sardinian Grenadiers using, because he was Austro-Hungarian, an assumed name. He was shot and killed on December 3, 1915 on Mount Podgora as the Fourth Battle of the Isonzo was drawing to a close.

Source

The Lost Voices of World War I, An International Anthology of Writers, Poets and Playwrights by Tim Cross, page 320, copyright © 1989 by The University of Iowa, publisher: University of Iowa Press, publication date: 1989

Tags

Scipio Slataper, Slataper, 1915, 1915-12-03, December