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1898 map of St. Petersburg, the Russian capital, from a German atlas. Central St Petersburg, or Petrograd, is on the Neva River. Key landmarks include the Peter and Paul Fortress, which served as a prison, Nevski Prospect, a primary boulevard south of the Fortress, the Finland Train Station, east of the Fortress, where Lenin made his triumphal return, the Tauride (Taurisches) Palace, which housed the Duma and later the Petrograd Soviet.
Text:
St Petersburg (Petrograd); Neva River, Peter and Paul Fortress; Nevski Prospect, Finland Bahnhof (Train Station); Taurisches (Tauride) Palace

1898 map of St. Petersburg, the Russian capital, from a German atlas. Central St Petersburg, or Petrograd, is on the Neva River. Key landmarks include the Peter and Paul Fortress, which served as a prison, Nevski Prospect, a primary boulevard south of the Fortress, the Finland Train Station, east of the Fortress, where Lenin made his triumphal return, the Tauride (Taurisches) Palace, which housed the Duma and later the Petrograd Soviet.

Image text

St Petersburg (Petrograd); Neva River, Peter and Paul Fortress; Nevski Prospect, Finland Bahnhof (Train Station); Taurisches (Tauride) Palace

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Friday, February 23, 1917

"The Imperial Duma is to resume its labours on Tuesday next, the 27th February, and the fact is causing excitement in industrial quarters. To-day, various agitators have been visiting the Putilov works, the Baltic Yards and the Viborg quarter, preaching a general strike as a protest against the government, food-shortage and war.

The agitation has been lively enough to induce General Kharbalov, Military Governor of the capital, to issue a notice prohibiting public meetings and informing the civil population that 'all resistance to authority will be immediately put down by force of arms.'"

Quotation Context

Excerpt from the entry for February 23, 1917 from the memoir of Maurice Paléologue, French ambassador to Imperial Russia in the capital of Petrograd. The Putilov works was a leading weapons manufacturer; the Viborg quarter, north of central Petrograd, was the site of factories and worker housing. The bitter winter had made it impossible for the transport system to deliver adequate food supplies to major cities such as Petrograd. The Russian Duma had not met for two months.

Source

An Ambassador's Memoirs Vol. III by Maurice Paléologue, pp. 201–202, publisher: George H. Doran Company

Tags

1917-02-23, 1917, February, Putilov Works, Putilov, Viborg, Petrograd