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Influenza Pandemic

A British Mark IV tank advances across the red field, star and crescent moon of a Turkish flag under a chain of grey and yellow clouds. Entitled Entente-török fegyverszünet, Entente-Turkish Armistice, it refers to the British-Turkish Armistice signed on October 30, 1918, that took effect on October 31. Original watercolor postcard by Schima Martos.

A British Mark IV tank advances across the red field, star and crescent moon of a Turkish flag under a chain of grey and yellow clouds. Entitled Entente-török fegyverszünet, Entente-Turkish Armistice, it refers to the British-Turkish Armistice signed on October 30, 1918, that took effect on October 31. Original watercolor postcard by Schima Martos.

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Entente-török fegyverszünet



Entente-Turkish Armistice

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A strain of influenza struck in the summer of 1918, affecting soldiers and civilians alike. An unpleasant flu in the spring of 1918, it turned deadly by the autumn.

Neutral Spain freely reported on the extent and dangers of the disease, as the combatant nations did not, which may be why it was labeled 'Spanish Flu'.

After laying low in late summer, the influenza re-emerged in a more deadly version. As it began to kill, some thought it was a new weapon of war.

The influenza was at its most deadly in late 1918. It struck again in 1919, and continued beyond until it had run its course through our planet's population. By the time it ended, it had killed more people than the war itself.

In October 1918,