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Noyon-Montdidier Offensive - the Fourth German Drive

Folding postcard relief map looking north from the River Aisne to the Oise Canal, from Compiègne to Soissons, and from Noyon to St. Gobain, France. A hand drawn arrow indicates Pimprez, marked with an 'X'.
Reverse:
Cards number 2101 (left/west) and 2102 (right/east). Kunst-u. Verlagsanstalt Schaar & Dathe, Komm.-Ges. a. Akt, Trier.

Folding postcard relief map looking north from the River Aisne to the Oise Canal, from Compiègne to Soissons, and from Noyon to St. Gobain, France. A hand drawn arrow indicates Pimprez, marked with an 'X'.

Image text

Reverse:

Cards number 2101 (left/west) and 2102 (right/east). Kunst-u. Verlagsanstalt Schaar & Dathe, Komm.-Ges. a. Akt, Trier.

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At the beginning of the year, Ludendorff had aimed to defeat the British be separating them from the French, and driving them back to the Channel. Both Operation Michael, the Somme Offensive, and Operation Georgette, the Lys Offensive, had failed, in part because French reinforcements had supported the British. The draw the French back from the British line, and to prevent them from again reinforcing it, Ludendorff launched his Aisne Offensive. Its success far exceeded his limited aims, and left his forces only 56 miles from Paris. The French, supported by American troops newly in the line, stabilized the line by June 4.

Ludendorff next offensive was along a line north and south of the Oise River. The German Eighteenth Army under General Hutier held the line north of the Oise from Montdidier to Noyon. On their left, south of the Oise, was the Seventh Army (Boehn) along the Aisne. Two French armies faced the Germans, the Third Army (Humbert) north of the Oise and Tenth Army (Mangin) to the south.

German morale was crumbling, and deserters gave the French details of the impending offensive.

Ten minutes before the Germans began their preparatory barrage on June 9, the French began a counter-barrage. Still, the Germans advanced on June 9 and again on the 10th. On June 9, the Germans attacked the French along the line from Noyon to Montdidier. On June 11, French and American troops counter-attacked. The next day, ON JUNE12???, the German Seventh Army attacked along the Aisne, making some headway.

But the French, with American support, held. Ludendorff halted his offensive one June 13. General Pétain began to saw an end to the endless war.

In March 1918, Germany had had 4,600,000 men in 235 divisions with battalions of over 800 men. By mid-summer those battalions were down to 600 men. At the beginning of the year, German morale had been good, but was falling. The blockade of Germany was strangling the country

1918-06-09

1918-06-13

Noyon-Montdidier Offensive - the Fourth German Drive is part of Germany's 1918 Offensives on the Western Front.