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Pen and ink sketch of the Ypres Cloth Hall dated 1916 by N. Faeror? Faeroir? On November 22, 1914, German forces shelled the Hall and St. Peter's Cathedral with incendiary shells. In his memoirs, French General %+%Person%m%11%n%Ferdinand Foch%-%, wrote that they did so to compensate themselves for their defeat in the %+%Event%m%96%n%Battle of Flanders%-%.
Text:
Ypres
signed: N. Faeror? Faeroir? 1916

Pen and ink sketch of the Ypres Cloth Hall dated 1916 by N. Faeror? Faeroir? On November 22, 1914, German forces shelled the Hall and St. Peter's Cathedral with incendiary shells. In his memoirs, French General Ferdinand Foch, wrote that they did so to compensate themselves for their defeat in the Battle of Flanders.

Image text

Ypres

signed: N. Faeror? Faeroir? 1916

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Sunday, January 14, 1917

"As intelligence officer, I, too, was many times out in No Man's Land here. It may be well to say more, since those times and tortures are now almost forgotten. The wirers were out already, clanking and whispering with what seemed a desperate energy, straining to screw their pickets into the granite. The men lying at each listening-post were freezing stiff, and would take half an hour's buffeting and rubbing on return to avoid becoming casualties. Moonlight, steely and steady, flooded the flat space between us and the Germans. I sent my name along, 'Patrol going out,' and, followed by my batman, blundered over the parapet, down the borrow-pit, and through our meagre but mazy wire. Come, once again.

The snow is hardened and crunches with a sort of music. Only me, Worley. He lays a gloved hand on my sleeve, puts his head close, and says, 'God bless you, sir—don't stay out too long.' Then we stoop along his wire to a row of willows, crop-headed, nine in a row, pointing to the German line. . . ."

Quotation Context

Edmund Blunden, English writer, recipient of the Military Cross, second lieutenant and adjutant in the Royal Sussex Regiment, writing of going on a patrol into No Man's land, one moonlit night in January, 1917. He was then stationed near Ypres, Belgium. 'The granite' is frozen ground.

Source

Undertones of War by Edmund Blunden, page 160, copyright © the Estate of Edmund Blunden, 1928, publisher: Penguin Books, publication date: November 1928

Tags

1917-01-14, 1917, January, night patrol, Ypres Cloth Hall