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British pilots and ground crew with three S.E.5-A fighters in front of their hangars. The plane in the foreground has its engine running.
Text, reverse:
Pencil: S.E.5A; stamped: 29

British pilots and ground crew with three S.E.5-A fighters in front of their hangars. The plane in the foreground has its engine running.

Image text

Reverse:

Pencil: S.E.5A; stamped: 29

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Thursday, August 15, 1918

"We had entered on a tremendously busy time. The impulse eastwards which the Western Front had been given was gathering mass and momentum. Since the line immediately south of Albert was being straightened preparations for a big advance on the Divisional front were being improved. Company Commanders had frequent summonses to H.Q. for conference, and to be given instructions about likely developments. . . . There was considerable aerial activity on both sides, day and night. . . . The Germans did nothing untoward beyond subjecting the whole area to periodic shelling. . . . Our night operations were interfered with a good deal by the dropping of brilliant parachute lights of greatly improved pattern, which were effective over a wide area and burned for a long time, compelling us to stand still . . ."

Quotation Context

Edited excerpt from an entry for August 15 to 18, 1918 from the writings — diaries, letters, and memoirs — of Captain J. C. Dunn, Medical Officer of the Second Battalion His Majesty's Twenty-Third Foot, the Royal Welch Fusiliers, and fellow soldiers who served with him. The 'impulse eastwards' had begun on August 8 with the Anglo-French Battle of Amiens.

Source

The War the Infantry Knew 1914-1919 by Captain J.C. Dunn, page 507, copyright © The Royal Welch Fusiliers 1987, publisher: Abacus (Little, Brown and Company, UK), publication date: 1994

Tags

1918-08-15, 1918, August, parachute light, S.E.5-A,