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%i1%La Domenica del Corriere%i0% (The Sunday Courier) of March 25 to April 1, 1917, an illustrated weekly supplement to Corriere della Sera, published in Milan, Italy. The front and back covers are full-page illustrations by the great Italian illustrator Achille Beltrame. The front cover depicts Russian troops cheering the deputies entering the Duma after what the paper calls, 'the Russian revolt for freedom and the war.' The secondary story was on the fall of Baghdad to British troops.
Text:
a Domenica del Corriere
25 Marzo — 1 Aprile 1917.
L'insurrezione russa per la libertà e la guerra. Le truppe acclamano i deputati che entrano alla Duma.
The Russian revolt for freedom and the war. The troops cheer the deputies entering the Duma.

La Domenica del Corriere (The Sunday Courier) of March 25 to April 1, 1917, an illustrated weekly supplement to Corriere della Sera, published in Milan, Italy. The front and back covers are full-page illustrations by the great Italian illustrator Achille Beltrame. The front cover depicts Russian troops cheering the deputies entering the Duma after what the paper calls, 'the Russian revolt for freedom and the war.' The secondary story was on the fall of Baghdad to British troops.

Image text

a Domenica del Corriere

25 Marzo — 1 Aprile 1917.

L'insurrezione russa per la libertà e la guerra. Le truppe acclamano i deputati che entrano alla Duma.

The Russian revolt for freedom and the war. The troops cheer the deputies entering the Duma.

Other views: Larger

Monday, March 12, 1917

"The Duma's failure to announce an official session was tantamount to committing political suicide at the very moment when its authority was at its height in the country and the army, and when it could have been of far-reaching benefit. This demonstrated the weakness of a Duma largely based on a narrow upper-class franchise, which had inevitably restricted its capacity to reflect the mood of the nation as a whole. By failing to take the initiative, the Duma became a private body on a par with the Soviet of Workers' Deputies, which was then just beginning to emerge. The next day, realizing his mistake, Rodzyanko made an attempt to revive the Duma as an official institution. But it was too late. By then there were already two centers of authority in the capital, both of which owed their existence to the Revolution. They were the Duma in unofficial session, with its Provisional Committee appointed as a temporary guiding body, and the Soviet of Workers' Deputies, guided by its Executive Committee."

Quotation Context

On Monday, March 12, 1917 (February 27, Old Style), Tsar Nicholas suspended the Duma, Russia's lower house, even as soldiers joined the protesters who had been thronging the streets of Petrograd, the capital, since the 8th. Our author, Alexander Kerensky, a leader of the left-wing opposition, argued for ignoring the Tsar's order and for holding an official session, but he and his colleagues were voted down. In the early afternoon, soldiers and civilian protesters arrived at the Duma looking to it for leadership. Kerensky led them into the building, the Tauride Palace, where the Soviet of Workers' Deputies also established itself before the day was out. A youthful, compelling orator, Kerensky served in the Duma and was elected to the Soviet, the only member of both. Mikhail Rodzyanko was President of the State Duma. By the end of the day, the Russian Revolution was a fact.

Source

Russia and History's Turning Point by Alexander Kerensky, page 196, copyright © 1965 by Alexander Kerensky, publisher: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, publication date: 1965

Tags

1917-03-12, 1917, March, February Revolution, Duma, Soviet, soviet, Russian Duma, Russian Revolution