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Central detail from a 1898 map of St. Petersburg, the Russian capital, from a German atlas. Central St Petersburg, or Petrograd, is on the Neva River. Key landmarks include the Peter and Paul Fortress, which served as a prison, Nevski Prospect, a primary boulevard south of the Fortress, the Finland Train Station, east of the Fortress, where Lenin made his triumphal return, the Tauride (Taurisches) Palace, which housed the Duma and later the Petrograd Soviet.
Text:
Neva River, Peter and Paul Fortress; Nevski Prospect, Finland Bahnhof (Train Station); Taurisches (Tauride) Palace

Central detail from a 1898 map of St. Petersburg, the Russian capital, from a German atlas. Central St Petersburg, or Petrograd, is on the Neva River. Key landmarks include the Peter and Paul Fortress, which served as a prison, Nevski Prospect, a primary boulevard south of the Fortress, the Finland Train Station, east of the Fortress, where Lenin made his triumphal return, the Tauride (Taurisches) Palace, which housed the Duma and later the Petrograd Soviet.

Image text

St Petersburg (Petrograd); Neva River, Peter and Paul Fortress; Nevski Prospect, Finland Bahnhof (Train Station); Taurisches (Tauride) Palace

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Monday, March 12, 1917

"Shortly afterwards, someone came to tell me that the Volhynian regiment of the Guard had mutinied during the night, killed its officers and was parading in the city, calling on the people to take part in the revolution and trying to win over the troops who stilled remain loyal. . . .

One piece of bad news followed another. The Law Courts had become nothing but an enormous furnace; the Arsenal on the Liteïny, the Ministry of the Interior, the Military Government building, the Minister of the Courts' offices, the headquarters of the Detective Force, the too, too famous
Okhrana, and a score of police-stations were in flames; the prisons were open and all the prisoners had been liberated; the Fortress of SS. Peter and Paul was undergoing a siege and the Winter Palace was occupied. Fighting was in progress in every part of the city."

Quotation Context

Two paragraphs from the entry from the memoirs of Maurice Paléologue, French Ambassador to Russia, for Monday, March 12, 1917. The mutiny of the Volhynian (or Volinsk) Regiment, roughly 660 strong, would grow to nearly the entire Petrograd garrison of 170,000 men siding with the revolution. The looted Arsenal provided the revolution with weapons. The Tsar's secret police, the Okhrana, were feared and loathed. The Fortress of Peter and Paul, on an island in the Neva River, was an arsenal, fortress, and prison directly across the river from the Winter Palace, the Tsar's Petrograd residence.

Source

An Ambassador's Memoirs Vol. III by Maurice Paléologue, pp. 222 and 223, publisher: George H. Doran Company

Tags

1917-03-12, 1917, March, Petrograd